Introduction

The Calendar

1. The Season of Fleurs

Fleurs is so-called because, throughout this season, bright and cheery blooms appear on most flowering plants.

Day length: Long days, growing longer.

Weather: Mild.

Food prices & availability: Food prices variable, from normal to high. Cereals available only where they have been diligently stored over the winter (in castle stores, in municipal/community granaries, or, on a smaller scale, by private households and merchants). Fresh vegetables available for the first time since the winter.

Agricultural activity: The planting of the autumn crops begins. Vegetable gardens are planted and, by late season, begin to yield regular produce. Those summer not devastated by the winter crops begin to mature. Fruit-trees begin to bloom.

Other economic activity: Herds are put out to pasture for the spring. Fleurs is the most common birthing season for livestock, and most herds begin to recover from their decrease over the winter.

Festivals: The 1st of Fleurs is New Year's Day. New Year's Day celebrates the end of winter and the beginning of the agricultural year. Festivities typically consist of dances, games, parades and (in pious communities) offerings to locally relevant deities. Feasting and drinking may be limited due to food shortages. Weddings may be timed to coincide with festivities, made convenient by the gathering of the community.

2. The Season of Burrs

Burrs is named for the prickly dry-fruits which begin to appear on burdock bushes during this season.

Note: Every fourth year in an eight year cycle, an intercalary day is added to Burrs, making it 34 days long.

Day length: Long days, growing longer.

Weather: Dry.

Food prices & availability: Food prices variable, from normal to high. Cereals available only where they have been diligently stored over the winter.

Agricultural activity: The planting of the autumn crops continues until the end of the season. Vegetable gardens continue to yield produce. Summer crops continue to mature. Fruit-trees continue to bloom.

Other economic activity: Herds are out to pasture.

3. The Season of Kindle

The season of Kindle is named for its the extreme dryness, which makes wildfires common in some areas.

Day length: Very long days.

Weather: Very dry. Wildfires common in some areas. Small courses of water may dry up, causing droughts.

Food prices & availability: Food prices drop to low, due to the summer harvest. Fresh cereals are available for the first time since the winter.

Agricultural activity: The harvest of the summer crops begins. Vegetable gardens continue to yield produce. Autumn crops begin to mature. Fruit-trees begin to ripen.

Other economic activity: Herds are out to pasture.

Festivals: Early in the season, summer harvest festivals are celebrated. Exact dates vary according the the local availability of first-fruits (the first produce to be harvested), and festivities may last for a day, several days or even a full week, according to local custom. In all but the least pious communities, first-fruits will be offered to the locally relevant deities, but the central element of festivities will usually be a feast or series of feasts, including singing, dancing, games and excessive drinking. Weddings may be timed to coincide with festivities, made convenient by the gathering of the community.

The 28th of Kindle is High Sunday (the approximate date of the summer solstice). High Sunday is held to be a particularly auspicious day (in communities which acknowledge a sun-deity, it may be associated with the height of that deity's benevolent power; in other communities, it is just a good-luck day).

4. The Season of Dwindle

Dwindle is so-called because the days begin to grow shorter this season.

Day length: Long days, growing shorter.

Weather: Dry.

Food prices & availability: Food prices remain low, due to the summer harvest.

Agricultural activity: The harvest of the summer crops continues until the end of the season. Vegetable gardens continue to yield produce. Autumn crops continue to mature. Fruit-trees continue to ripen.

Other economic activity: Herds are moved to seek new pasture for the autumn.

Festivals:

5. The Season of Brindle

Brindle is named for the streaky appearance of farmland during the season (some fields green with maturing autumn crops, but the fields of the recently harvested summer crops lying brown and fallow), which is thought to resemble the streaky 'brindle' colouring of horses and other animals.

Day length: Long days, growing shorter.

Weather: Mild.

Food prices & availability: Food prices normal. Fresh fruit becomes available.

Agricultural activity: The fruit-picking season begins. Vegetable gardens continue to yield produce. Autumn crops continue to mature. Fields used for summer crops lie fallow after the harvest.

Other economic activity: Herds are out to pasture.

Festivals:

6. The Season of Leaves

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7. The Season of Sheaves

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8. The Season of Eaves

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9. The Season of Snows

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10. The Season of Throes

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11. The Season of Flows

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