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ID: 6048

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May 19, 2010, 8:35 pm

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Cheka Man

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The Madness of Avool

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How a disgruntled con man managed to kill hundreds, become a saint among death cults, and create plagues of monsters.  All by writing a pamphlet.

The First Madness

Avool pan Ankhri was a failing con artist. He made a living by selling snake oils, false cures, and famously--pamphlets. He worked out of Shar, and could often be seen on the streets selling his worthless potions and false charms against the evil eye. He also sold booklets of pseudo-religious nonsense: The Secrets of the Celestial Martyrs, The Hidden Prophecies of St. Nashanial, and The Five Forbidden Pressure Points of Dreadful Death.

After a particularly bad day, involving the collections of debt collectors, the scorn of the crowds, and the infidelity of his mistress, Avool sank into a particularly black mood. He retreated into his wagon to write what would be his last pamphlet: The True Nature of our Situation. He took the pamphlet to the printer's and had a few hundred copies made. By the next day Avool pan Ankhri was selling them in the marketplace, and the printer was found hung from the rafters, his heels swaying in the cold air.

The facts are these:

Anyone who reads The True Nature will fall into a deep depression, and eventually take their own life. 

Anyone who is told enough about The True Nature will fall into a deep depression, and eventually take their own life.

Anyone who learns about the philosophies of The True Nature, even by scrying or oracle, will fall into a deep depression and eventually take their own life.

In this way, the poisonous words of Avool Pan Ankhri spread across Shar, as people shared the pamphlets and discussed it with each other. Mothers wondered what their child had been reading before he took his own life.  Men tried to talk their friends out of suicide, only to find themselves quickly convinced enough to join them.  Even when a state of panic over the number of suicides gripped the city, philosophers and mages continued to seek out the booklet and read it--perhaps not believing that words on a page would drive them to end their own life.

Avool was forced to flee angry mobs of people whose loved ones had committed suicide. He crossed the bay to the Seamount, and hid for days in the caves. It was said that he carved a sequel to "The True Nature" into the inside of the caverns there. But, he was eventually captured by Shar guards with their ears plugged to avoid hearing the toxic words that Avool shouted while they carried him back for trial.

(Almost) all surviving copies of the dread pamphlet were destroyed, and all talk of it was banned. This is the only act of censorship ever enacted by Sharland.  Since it was not considered a crime to print a pamphlet that wasn't treasonous, the city decided to imprison him for life, despite the enormous public outcry.  He is there to this day, in a soundproof cell.  The guards stuff their ears with wax and try to avoid looking at any words that the madman might have scratched in the dust.

Interestingly, the copies of The True Nature that were studied (but not read) by mages revealed them to be nonmagical, and completely devoid of compulsion-type enchantments. Any compulsion that they created in their readers was simply by the power of the words alone. The only person who has read the pamphlet without incident is Lhasadet, one of the serypha and the head librarian at the Library of Kalamon.  She agreed with the wizard’s diagnosis, saying that the pamphlet was “just lines of ink on a parchment.”

Avool pan Ankhri seems to have written the single most depressing, fatalistic publication in existence.

The Second Madness

Even after the Madness of Avool had driven many of the citizens to Shar to suicide, it was some years later when the true evil of what Avool had created was realized.

The pamphlets had not been completely destroyed, and they could be copied safely by scribes who did not read Common. A few individuals began using The True Nature as justification for very evil deeds (although some of them were surely lying) or saying that the pamphlet had made them do the terrible things that they did. While the average person would receive the impression that "My life is not worth living", especially wicked individuals would gain the doctrine of "No one is worthy of life". Presumably, this was the philosophy that Avool pan Ankhri himself endorsed as he disseminated his terrible words. A number of death cults include all or part of The True Nature their doctrines.

The Third Madness

It seems that a people who continue living after reading The True Nature, and dwell frequently on the teachings of Avool, sometimes undergo a very bizarre physiological change. Specifically, several purple worms appear in their brain. 

In a world that believes in spontaneous generation, wizards agree that this phenomenon is no more remarkable than the known fact that maggots spontaneously appear in rotten meat.

The worms were called Third Madnesses, and as they grow in one's skull, they cause headaches, delusions, and blackouts.  After being released from the skull (use your imagination), the worms can grow to enormous sizes. While the smaller ones are can be somewhat domesticated, the larger worms (30' or so) are incredibly aggressive. Some of the aforementioned cults raise the worms, releasing them when they grow too large to control, while keeping the smaller ones to guard their lairs.

At all life stages, each worm can speak, and has a vocabulary of exactly one word (presumably taken from The True Nature) that it continually mutters.  A Third Madness can secrete a staggering array of poisons. Larger worms learn to fight intelligently and can explosively vomit their stomach contents, usually a foul mixture of broken bone and bile.  Like the ideas that spawned them, the worms are distinctly non-magical.

GM Notes

I'm of the opinion that a truly evil book that is capable of warping an innocent brain and inflicting deformity-inducing curses should not be any less terrifying if it is read in a null magic zone.

If you feed a program the wrong data or return the wrong variable type, it sometimes collapses into loops that can corrupt or crash the entire program.  This is what happens when a conscious being understands the ideas in The True Nature.  Like a prion (a single molecule) that can crystallize huge tracts of your brain.  Like a seed crystal that can turn a liquid to a solid without any magic needed.  This is what an idea does to parts of some unlucky brain.

The corrupted brain bits get trapped in this cycle, and they unconsciously begin to use magic.  This single, primordial spell turns nearby tissue into annelid germ plasm.  Alternate personalities get trapped in PCs brains all the time in fantasy settings.  This is like that--only its an brain subroutine gone rogue, an unconscious loop in the blind spot of the primitive brain.

This is something of a radical idea: that a "cursed" fighter could simply have a corrupted subsection of his brain that is subconsciously casting crude spells.  This doesn't work in campaigns where spellcasting is strongly tied to intention and intelligence and nothing else.  But everywhere else, I believe this provides a novel and dangerous sort of "curse", that has its roots in memory, subsists through biology, and only eventually grows into the realm of magic.

 

 

P.S. I have no idea what category I should file this under.  I only placed it here because the PCs are most likely to learn about the Madness of Avool through a doomsday cult.



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Comments ( 14 )
Commenters gain extra XP from Author votes.

Voted Cheka Man
May 18, 2010, 22:16
0xp
One of these pamphlets could be used as a booby-tap in a tomb.
Voted Redgre
May 18, 2010, 23:06
0xp
This is an excellent idea, a non-magically cursed scroll, well sort of. However, I have a few questions... What if a PC were to read a pamphlet? What would the GM tell the player about the contents? Along the same vein, what gives the pamphlet its' power? Was the con man inspired by some demonic force perhaps? I would really appreciate more of the hidden background as a fellow GM... if I were going to use this. Keep it coming. You've got great ideas.
Forganthus
May 18, 2010, 23:42
0xp
This has the potential to be an extremely dangerous piece of paper, and I wouldn't spring it on the PCs without some sort of warning.

A PC who started reading the pamphlet would quickly start making Will saves of increasing difficulty, with failures causing a morale penalty. After losing 5 or so, the PC should become suicidal. Even after the PC finishes reading it, they continue making Will saves as long as they think about it. If they want to stop thinking about it and put it out of their head, this requires another Will save, and even then, their mind might wander back to it at some later point. Magical means might be necessary to make them forget it completely.

I really think that contents of The True Nature are best left undescribed--most people have their own ideas about what the most depressing thing is. If you insist, though, you could sprinkle in nihilist creeds, "God is Dead" quotes, or the depressing parts of determinism.

It really is just words on a paper. A poem can invoke emotion. This one can evoke a LOT of emotion.

I don't have a specific force that inspired Avool. I agree, though, that SOMETHING should be behind it. I'll cross that bridge when I get to it.
Cheka Man
May 19, 2010, 10:03
0xp
Sort of like "The Charge of the Light Brigade" but in a nasty rather then an inspiring way.
Voted Scrasamax
May 19, 2010, 11:10
0xp
I dont get where the purple brain worms come from, I would probably not use that aspect in a game, but a suicide inducing pamphlet written by a madman, that I really like.
Forganthus
May 19, 2010, 20:35
0xp
Update: I edited the worm section and added a new section for DMs that details how a non-magical curse works.
Voted valadaar
May 22, 2010, 18:22
0xp
Very impressive - and I'd have no problem with the worms in a world with magic.




Voted Ouroboros
May 26, 2010, 6:19
0xp
Impressive. I really like this one, and especially the prion analogy. Highly original and written with some flair, too - good work!

//David
Voted Jarons20
May 26, 2010, 23:31
1xp
Reminds me of the Funniest Joke ever Written and how it was used as a weapon of war against the Third Reich by translating it into German.
Voted Strolen
May 29, 2010, 22:08
0xp
Oh, yes! Love that mages and philosophers sought it out as they may not have believed that a simple parchment could do something like this.

Brilliant idea!

The worms don't do anything for me but I see what you are doing with them.
Voted Pieh
November 20, 2010, 6:27
0xp

Awesome! Next time I see a guy on a street corner preaching doom and hellfire, I'm going to give him a hug... In hopes of preventing this kind of disaster in our world. Imagine those giant purple bile-and-bone-spewing worm-beasts attacking busses and crawling through subway tunnels... What a mess that would be. Not to mention that only the most evil of people are safe from it, relatively anyway. This is a nasty thing to spring on a game world. I approve.

Voted Murometz
March 13, 2012, 22:30
0xp

Good one. Sets the mind to reeling!

Voted Chaosmark
March 15, 2012, 18:47
0xp

How in the world did I miss this? An excellent fragment of dystopia to include in a setting.

Voted Mourngrymn
March 15, 2012, 23:23
0xp

I agree, this is superbly disturbing. I echo a few statements having been said, even after the edit the purple worms are still iffy for me but its not for everyone. Has so much playability and potential.



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