Idea Guild > Sagely Advice

D&D Alignements and Cruel Gods

<< < (2/7) > >>

Ylorea:
In general, like the entire D&D game, allignment is a simplification.

Having said this and following this thought into the extreme, I might add that Moonhunter must hate all game systems, since all of them are simplifications of the real world.

In my personal opinion, allignment as you write it on your charactersheet is a declaration of how you will behave.
In the game however, you can still behave in a fashion that is oposite to your allignment.

Much more important is that most people see allignment as two different variables. One line Good-versus-Evil and one line Chaos-versus-Law. However, if you follow the posting of Strolen, it becomes clear that allignement is not two independent lines, but a two-dimensional array.

If the paladin does a detect allignment, he checks not how does the goblin behave right now, but how should the goblin behave in general.
The thing is: A Paladin should not kill anyone who has a evil intent, but those who enact their evil intent right now.

Yours,

Ylorea

young0ne2:

--- Quote from: Ylorea on January 07, 2004, 03:36:13 AM ---In general, like the entire D&D game, alignment is a simplification.

Having said this and following this thought into the extreme, I might add that Moonhunter must hate all game systems, since all of them are simplifications of the real world.

In my personal opinion, alignment as you write it on your charactersheet is a declaration of how you will behave.
In the game however, you can still behave in a fashion that is opposite to your alignment.
--- End quote ---

This is Extremely important to consider. This is something that i know my players have had very big issues with, and as a DM have had to deal with.

The best description that i can think of comes from the World Of Warcraft RPG book, where it says ( I'm not quoting it because its not in front of me at this moment) that Alignment is a GUIDE to how your character should act and make decisions. With that, your "Human", the most lawful good priest can strike out at a present in rage because they were just pushed too far, just as the most chaotic evil blood thirsty barbarian can take compassion on a child and save their life.

Alignment is just their to give you a baseline idea of how you should act. To those that report to a higher being (Paladins, Clerics, Etc.) i would look at the gods domains and go from their. If you have a god that believes in good and redemption (St. Cuthbert i thinks a good example) Killing the armed evil goblins makes sense, but to kill the woman and child isent. 1 their defenceless and 2, they could be redeemed and start a new "good" life.

valadaar:
There are some gems in this conversation.

I'd suggest that the Detect Good/Evil/Law/Chaos spells be replaced with Detect Friend,Detect Foe or perhaps Detect Believer, Detect Heretic,Detect Heathen.  This is in line with Manfreds original post I think and a good way to relativize the spells.

MysticMoon:
I think the Paladin, as written (based on my last exposure to D&D), really only makes sense when worshipping a God that expects its followers to believe in absolutes. The dilemma only matters because the absolute of good vs evil is confronted with the reality of grey areas. It is the kind of dilemma that a good player could really latch onto. If the Paladin kills the helpless then he must deal with his guilt. If he does not, then he must always worry about the evil that he allowed to flourish. That kind of soul-searching guilt should really be a hallmark of such a character/alignment.

valadaar:
Agreed.  His powers also stem from the fact that Good is considered to be difficult, and helps to keep him from being overpowered.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version