llamaenterhear

Author Topic: Cool sub systems in RPGs question  (Read 1039 times)

0 Members and 1 Lonely Barbarian are spying on this topic.

Offline Aramax

  • Master
  • ***
  • Posts: 593
  • Awards Hall of Heroes 5 Lifeforms Guild Article Guild
    • Awards
Cool sub systems in RPGs question
« on: June 15, 2015, 09:35:42 AM »
Ok
Pathfinder has a 'chase' subsystem.
D&D 4th has skill challanges.
What other sysytems in other RPGs are there?
Ive lived a VERY sheltered game life, so Ive been exposed to none of the 'in' systems and wouuld love to hear about cool mechanics from other games
Thanx!!!!
Fighting for peace is like having sex for virginity

Offline Scrasamax

  • Redneck Hipster
  • Emperor
  • ****
  • Posts: 3889
  • You say insane like it's a bad thing
  • Awards 2013 Most Submissions 2012 Most Quest Submissions Hall of Heroes 10 Elite Questor Gold Creator 10 Elite Systems Guild
    • Coffee & Cthulhu
    • Awards
Re: Cool sub systems in RPGs question
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2015, 09:56:47 AM »
I can't remember the name of the system, but there was one that used poker rules in the dice system. It was more for contested rolls, like combat and whatnot, and rather than rolling against specific numbers, the dice would be rolled like a poker hand, with the skills providing the number of dice each side got to roll. After the toss, you would look for two of a kind, three of a kind, full house, straight, etc.
" If the muse comes to your bedside, don’t tell her you’ll f?$! her later."- Allen Ginsberg

Offline Scrasamax

  • Redneck Hipster
  • Emperor
  • ****
  • Posts: 3889
  • You say insane like it's a bad thing
  • Awards 2013 Most Submissions 2012 Most Quest Submissions Hall of Heroes 10 Elite Questor Gold Creator 10 Elite Systems Guild
    • Coffee & Cthulhu
    • Awards
Re: Cool sub systems in RPGs question
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2015, 10:02:53 AM »
The other house rule I use comes from the White Wolf World of Darkness games. You can roll a critical success or a critical failure. Roll the handful of dice, and if you have no successes and any 1's showing you've botched, and it's a critical failure. The gun jams in the firefight, the thrown punch hits a wall and you break your hand, in the car chase you blow the engine or dump the clutch. It doesn't happen very often, but when it does it can really slew the action off to one side. It can also be fun for information gathered, research, etc with the rolls being concealed from the player. This can lead to launching raids against the wrong targets, to a Police Chief Wiggum level calling an informant on the phone and asking how the snitching is going...while they are in a mafia meeting.

Critical success is the same thing, but not as awesome. WoD uses D10s so rolled 0's are counted twice for successes, or can be rolled open ended, if you roll another 0, you roll again, until you don't get another 0. I have seen a player roll 8 successes on 5 dice doing this.
" If the muse comes to your bedside, don’t tell her you’ll f?$! her later."- Allen Ginsberg

Offline Rizaleous

  • Apprentice
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • Skittering from the Shadows
    • Awards
Re: Cool sub systems in RPGs question
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2015, 08:36:16 PM »
Two systems in specific come to m mind:

1) Thanks to Pathfinder Unchained there is (in my mind) a really awesome new magical item crafting system in which a player must go through a challenge for every 5000 gold pieces of market worth. A minimum of two challenges are required, preparing the item and finishing the item.

What i think is so awesome about this system is that the players who are crafting get an opportunity to be really truly involved in the creation of their magical items. In addition, they can discount the price, decrease the production time and actually improve the weapon with minor perks, make it entertaining to play with by adding Quirks, or, on the flip-side they can increase the price over market value, increase the production time and put the weapon at a disadvantage with some minorly crippling flaws. As a GM, i've found that the players really don't like the Flaws all that much, so i've made a house rule where they can remove any Perk, Quirk, or Flaw off the item in question for 2000gp/item.

I've found this system really enhances the enjoyment of the game as we now have a guy with a very powerful weapon that does not appear magical to detect magic spells and appears physically junky to everyone around him, and he has particularly powerful armor that can be disguised as anything he wants but the trade off is it randomly changes his hair color every day (i roll 1D3+percentile to get RGB between the values of 0 and 255 for the colors) We've also got a player who's armor is essentially a mood ring, and another player who's belt of physical perfection has achieved sentience and intelligence and has taken a liking to it's owner but nobody else can hear it speak.

2) The FATE Core System from Evil Hat Productions runs entirely off of "fudge" dice or as they call them FATE dice (even though the dice were originally made for the FUDGE system... I digress), which are essentially D6's with 2 "+" signs and 2 "-" signs and 2 blank sides. the system treats the +'s as +1 and the -'s as -1 while the blanks are neutral. The player adds this to a skill value  that typically doesn't go above +5 or below 0. The GM sets difficulty ratings much like the DC's in Pathfinder. If the player breaks that DC by 3 or more it's called "succeeds with style" where the GM then has the player tell him/her what has happened to the environment based on the player's actions.

My experience with this was running a cthulian horror campaign in the FATE system. I had a player who was always checking the ceilings and always succeeding with style. So i basically told him what he saw, then improved upon it where i saw fit. The result were some extremely freaked out players OOC and IC. Very fun way to blur the line between the controlling hand of the story writer as a GM and the pawn as a player. It let's players get more involved in making the story their own rather than just reacting to the events the GM conjures up. I've also tried to consciously incorporate this mechanic into my pathfinder games to make it more engaging for the players when they roll critical hits. In addition to the extra damage they get to describe how they do the critical and they can sometimes put a disadvantage on the NPC's. All of it is privy to my final say though. To prevent the players from trying to Meta or just glide through the battles or challenges.

Very fun ways to add flavor to any game you're running imo.