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Question: Arcologies and Materialism

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Scrasamax:
There are certain things that serve as goals and hallmarks of the modern American life, buying a vehicle, getting a job, getting laid, having children, buying a home, the 'merican dream.

But what if ownership of a personal vehicle (automobile, motorcycle, etc) becomes unnecessary?

What if purchasing a home was suddenly simply no longer a need, or really an option?

Living in the age of Arcologies, people are going to be very centrally located. A personal vehicle is going to become a hindrance, there are no roads inside an arco. Instead it's mass transit, moving sidewalks, trams, internal rail systems. You can walk pretty much anywhere you need to go. So there is no need for cars, car loans, etc. The same goes for the personal home. The different decks function as villages and subdivisions, and your residence is likely going to be assigned to you by income, and social status. Bachelors are likely to share a multi-room bachelor pad, families would have apartment like spaces based on their family size and income. (to a point)

So, what does this materialistic comsumer culture, addicted to computers, look like? What would you do if you had no need for a car, no need for a home mortgage? Thought and comments requested:)

Dozus:
When material no longer matters, ideas gain value. A person's wealth is measured by the number and importance if the ideas they possess (copyright issues take the forefront).

And with computers, processing speed is important. Moore's Law conceivably has a ceiling: processors will reach a maximum calculations per second that can never physically be breached. The ownership and/or access to scores of processors to process data would be a conceivable measure of wealth.

Scrasamax:

--- Quote from: Dozus on April 09, 2012, 11:42:36 AM ---When material no longer matters, ideas gain value. A person's wealth is measured by the number and importance if the ideas they possess (copyright issues take the forefront).

And with computers, processing speed is important. Moore's Law conceivably has a ceiling: processors will reach a maximum calculations per second that can never physically be breached. The ownership and/or access to scores of processors to process data would be a conceivable measure of wealth.

--- End quote ---

The 4th gen internet takes a greater precedence, and I can imagine either working in online venues/stations are going to replace manufacturing and other jobs machines can do better. Moore's Law isn't going to really come into play since it's going to be a whole new level of technology inside of the computers. Comparing these new machines to modern computers is going to be comparing an F1 racer to the 1898 Mercedes prototype car.

People who actually create the material for the online domains are going to become more important, and I can see online or virtual possessions becoming more important that physical possessions. I could see a teenager owning a virtual beachfront house, or the children of wealthy parents having their own virtual playground islands and whatnot

Pariah:
I personally feel like the desire to "Keep up with the Joneses" won't go away, instead of fancy cars and a mansion for the Arc dwellers, that disposable income will instead go to other signs of wealth and prestige; fancy clothes, an 108" fulll 3d flat screen tv with surround sound, bling-bling, cosmetic surgery, escort girls (or boys, as the case may be), body guards.  While I admit the idea of an "idea based" society is appealing to me, that shiny yellow metal has been a constant sign of wealth for upwards of 4000 years of human civilization despite (or because of) how useless it is.  Signs of wealth aren't about "use" so much as saying "I have enough money I can waste it on this."  But that's just my 2 cents.

Scrasamax:
What if in this artificial trumping real reality, what it online gold trumps real gold or physical wealth. I play FarmVille, and there I am a millionaire with vast amounts of land and hundreds of head of livestock and a small city.

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