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Author Topic: My Language (or Dracklerese)  (Read 792 times)

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Offline Drackler

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My Language (or Dracklerese)
« on: February 21, 2009, 05:38:55 PM »
   One day as I was sitting there, doing nothing and quite bored, I picked up a piece of paper and a pen and began writing down a language as I made it up. After four and a half years of studying Latin and two years of Greek, I have some experience in how to do said thing.
   According to experience, I started by laying out the endings for the different forms of the verbs (first, second, and third persons, singular and plural). These are as follows:

Singular   Person   Plural
-a             1st          -ak
-an           2nd         -al
-as           3rd          -az

   In case anyone does not know, I will explain what the different persons do. When speaking in first person, you say 'I' (singular) or 'we' (plural), second person, 'you' (singular or plural), and third, he/she/it (singular) or they (plural). For instance, if I were to be saying that you tell me something (that I have way too much time on my hands, perhaps), then I would say 'instratan, or Instratal'. Insrata is the 1st person singular form of what I said, it means Instruct or Tell. When it is put in the 2nd person singular, the ending changes from '-a' to '-an', and when you change it to 2nd person plural, it changes to '-al'.
   Simple, isn't it? Alright, now that we have a verb (Instrata) to pay with we can get a little more coherent.

S.              Person   P.
Instrata    1st          Instratak
Instratan   2nd         Instratal
Instratas   3rd          Instrataz

   Now I've written out the forms of the verb Instrata in such a way that we can easily see how the endings fit on the verb. Next I think we'll tackle the nouns.

   If you have ever tried (successfully or not) to learn Latin, then you'll probably know that there are five different declensions, each one having a different set of nouns, making translating even harder because you have to know which declension the word is from. There are also four conjugations for verbs and one specifically for the 'to be' verb.
   My language, however, is much simpler. There are a total of two declensions, one for common nouns and one for proper nouns, and one conjugation (of course, there are different endings for different tenses, but we'll burn that bridge when we get to it).

   The Common declension is as follows (I am using the word 'Weory' to illustrate the endings. Weory means Man):

S.            Case           P.
Weory     Nominative  Weorin
Weoryt    Genitive      Weorith
Weoryng  Dative        Weoriph
Weoryl    Accusative  Weorik
Weoryg   Ablative      Weorint

   I have put the cases of the endings with each set of them. The cases each have their own meanings that are put on the noun. Nominative is the subject case; when a man is doing something he is the subject and, therefore, in the nominative case. Genitive is the possessive case; when something is of a man (or a man's), man is possessive, and in the genitive case. Dative is the Indirect object case; when someone is doing something  to something to or for a man, man is the indirect object, and in the dative case. Accusative is the direct object case; when someone is doing something to a man (such as telling) the man is the direct object, and in the accusative case. Ablative is sort of the miscellaneous case; if something is by with or from a man, then man is in the ablative.

   That's quite a bit of stuff right there, in my opinion. So I'll leave it at that for now. Well, not quite, I am going to leave you with a short vocabulary list:

Weory      Noun  Man
Mameory  Noun  Woman
Ory          Noun  Boy
Meory      Noun  Girl
Yeory       Noun  Child, Charge, or Ward
Blany       Noun  Sword or Knife

Sava        Verb  Kill
Instrata    Verb  Tell or Instruct
Da           Verb  Am (Conjugated just like any other verb, unlike in latin)
Dasha       Verb  Run
Runma      Verb  Go


   A note on pronunciation: All 'y's are pronounced 'ee' (speed). All 'i's are pronouced 'I' (Dinner). All 'e's are pronounced 'ay' (May). All 'a's are pronounced 'ah' (Ha). All 'u's are pronounced 'ooh' (food).
"And how can man die better than facing fearful odds, for the ashes of his fathers, or the temples of his gods."

Offline Drackler

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Re: My Language (or Dracklerese)
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2009, 07:39:29 PM »
Translations!

   A note on Da. The to be verb is peculiar in the fact that it uses the Predicative Nominative. Simply stated, this means that the direct object of Da uses the nominative case as opposed to the normally used accusative case.

   -The man runs to the woman
   Weory dashas mameoryng

   -The boy is a child
   Ory das yeory

   -The men kill the child of the woman (Yes, I know, very bloodthirsty)
   Weorin slavaz yeoryl mameoryt
"And how can man die better than facing fearful odds, for the ashes of his fathers, or the temples of his gods."

Offline Drackler

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Re: My Language (or Dracklerese)
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2009, 03:00:40 PM »
Translations!

   A note on Da. The to be verb is peculiar in the fact that it uses the Predicative Nominative. Simply stated, this means that the direct object of Da uses the nominative case as opposed to the normally used accusative case.

   -The man runs to the woman
   Weory dashas mameoryng

   -The boy is a child
   Ory das yeory

   -The men kill the child of the woman (Yes, I know, very bloodthirsty)
   Weorin slavaz yeoryl mameoryt

   -The man goes to the child.
   Weory Runmas Yeoryng

   -You go to the men.
   Runman/Runmal Weoriph

   -We inform the men. The men run to the women. The men tell the women
   Instratak Weorik. Weorin dashas Mameoriph. Weorin Instratas Mameorik.

   Note: If you are serious about learning this then you should, out loud, say the declension and the conjugation. Maybe even make some vocabulary cards for the words. The repetition of the words with the endings helps you to memorize them.
"And how can man die better than facing fearful odds, for the ashes of his fathers, or the temples of his gods."