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Offline MoonHunter

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StoryPath- an RP system proposal **
« on: May 13, 2004, 05:04:42 AM »
This is technically a non system site, but this is a system I am tinkering with for Forum based Games.

This is not my opus, it is a quick and easy to use game system I have used before.  Now I would like to clean it up some, and advance it from its primitive roots to a more complete game.  

You have a choice. Read through the entire thread or goto the new "beginning".
http://www.strolen.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=20755#20755

If you opt to read the entire thread, you will notice that the game's rules repeat.  The first time was some raw ideas I was putting down. The second time through, it is a fairly complete write up.  There are some comments there.  Here we go.


0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 00000000000

Preliminary work

StoryPath is similar to Storyboard, a very basic RPG game published a number of years ago.  StoryThread is character description based. The character is expressed by a number of traits (from 14 to 20 or so).  

Character Creation
1) Choose an Archetype appropriate to the milieu being played.  Most GMs will provide a list of appropriate ones, non standard ones must be discussed with and approved by the GM.  
*Certain archetypes will require the character to take certain general traits or be of a certain race. These requirements must be met by the basic character.  See the Ranger Example. Rangers in that Milieu are the elite forest fighting force of the country.  They require special training trait for a woodsman or soldier.  A character can not be a Ranger archetype without it.

Examples for a Generic Fantasy World:  
Fighter, Mage, Cleric, Rogue.

Examples for a Euro Medival Fantasy Game:
Knight, Squire, Lady, Woodsman, Druid, Priest.

Examples for Kerren: http://www.rpgcitadel.com/guild/index.php?board=26.0
Ryder, Edge, Wing Leader, Scale, Crafter, Noble.

Examples for Modern:
Doctor, Lawyer, Actor, Engineer, and so on...


2) List your species  This will normally be "Human", but other species can be possible given the milieu.
Elves, Dwarves, Vulcans, Cat People, Androids, etc.  
*Certain Species are quite advantagous.  Their advantages outweigh their disadvantages.  If a given species is advantagous, it might require the character to give up a general trait or three to be a member of the given species.  


3) Select 10 General Traits that define the character.  At least four of these should be aspect traits and another four should be skill traits.
*Traits should not be "duplicated", each one must be unique in its description.  A character can not take four traits of "strong". However, they could take four or more traits that describe their strength and build.  
*Ten is the basic rule.  Certain GMs might assign more or fewer general traits for characters in their campaign.  

Aspect traits are traits that define the character innate abilities.  This would cover physical (strength, endurance, and health), dexterial (speed, agility, manual dexterity), mental (wit, reason, and memory), emotional (willpower, empathy, etc), metaphysical (luck, power, and magical aptitude), and charismatic (appearance, influence, and charisma).  Traits tha could overlap into several areas must have which area.
 Examples:
"Olympic Body Builder"
"Lightning Wit"
"An intelligent gleem in the eyes" (mental or charismatic)
"Has "it" (a movie term for having stage presence)
"ripped muscles"
"catlike" (dexterital or metaphysical)

Skill traits are traits that define area of skill the character excells at.  This is mostly based on the milieu being played.
*Rule complication 1: Certain traits have prerequisites.  You must learn to fly an aircraft in general, before you can fly a fighter plane.  
*Rule complication 2: Group Skills- There are intensive sets of skills that are taught at one time.  These groups are normally from schools or formal institutions.  Commando Training, Astronaut Training, Battle Mage training, are examples there of.  These traits cost TWO traits, as these sking traits. However, they add to a wide variety of actions.  If the
*Rule complication 3: Archetype skill: If the character wants to be better at everything covered by their archetype, they can choose an archetype trait. It functions like a group trait and costs two traits.  

 Example:
Hotshot Pilot: knows how to fly airplanes and related craft
Jet Pilot (requires airplane pilot or the like): How to fly a jet craft
Top Gun Graduate:  able to fly a fighter jet craft well
Ex-militaryman: Knowledge of military proceedures and basic military skills.
Excellent trail cook: Can cook in the wilds
Swordsman: knowledge and usage of sword
Greatsword Expert: knowledge and usage of great sword.  
Tracker: Can follow prey in the wilds
Skilled at Jacking: Ability to use virtual reality computers via netjack
Slipping the Ice: Ability to avoid anti-personel/ security software in VR.

Special Traits are those that cover other gifts and abilities a character might have.  Social rank, contacts, special equipment, special talents (such as eidetic memory, mage sight, perfect pitch, double jointed), access to special powers not normally available to that archetype (Mage/ Esper/ etc), and special skills (specific spells or psionic effects).  
*Rule complication Power Traits. These allow characters to generate effects beyond what is normally possible for a character.  Any power trait, must have a "catch" or some limit that prevents it from being all powerful.  Most spell traits have the limit requires hands and voice to incant. Psionics often require a special drug or a focus crystal. Witch traits requires magical tools to use. The sources are limitless.  Addition to the rules complication:  If the character's archetype is based upon power use (Wizard, Esper, Witch, Mentat), power traits become skill traits for them.  

Example:
Hunted by the Mob/ Theives Guild/ Syndicate
Noble
Aquaintace with Guild Master/ Mayor/ President


4)Select a flaw Nobody is perfect, everyone has some complication in their life.  They could have a personal nemesis, a psychological issue (fears, odd psychological issues, limiting personal codes), a physical issue (lame leg, partially blind) or social issue (hated minority or some obnoxious social problem).  This issue should be a moderate one.
*Rule complication: More Flaws.  If you want more traits, you can get them by taking more flaws. You can take up to three more flaws; receiving one trait per flaw taken.  If the flaw more than moderately impairs the character, it is worth two traits (parapalegic, blind (without super powers to compensate), hunted by all the world's police forces, nemesis of the Assassin's guild, etc).  

*5) SuperPowers: SuperPowers are expansions upon the power traits rule.  These allow characters to generate effects far, far beyond what is normally possible for a character.  Like any power trait, a super power must have a "catch" or some limit that prevents it from being all powerful.  Super Powers cost more than one trait, in fact you can invest upto five traits into a super power.  The Average super power costs three traits, minor super powers cost two, one points powers are normally just special traits run amok. Four trait powers are more powerful super powers, with five point powers being world class, even for super beings.  
*The GM must determine how many traits they are going to allow for super powers.  10 would be suitable for a super hero game, while five might be good for a paranomals game.  

Example: SuperSpeed allows a person to move very quickly and do simple repetative tasks at inhuman speeds.  A very fast character might have superspeed with three traits (QuickSilver). A super speed character who focuses solely upon speed (Flash), will have five.  If the character is merely "quick" then they might have super speed with one trait (SpiderMan).  

*6) Experience -pre and post character creation- is an option. Each important chapter of the character's life generates experience.  Such a chapter has a title (High School. College. Defeating Torgon the Terrible. Assignment to The Enterprise).  Each chapter generates two general traits which can be applied appropriately.  A GM might allow players to take several periods of experience for their character, representing their character's life.  For every two chapters of experience, a character must take a flaw (see 4).  They receive no extra traits for this flaw.  

Example:
HighSchool (Paid attention in class (General Knowledge) and Buff (developed strength and body in Highschool)
Defeated the Horde (Perfected the slashing sword attack and Being quieter than a shadow).  
Assignment to the Enterprise (Ships Operation and Friend with Ryker)

After play starts, the GM can give a character a chapter when they complete one strong story arc or three good stories.  For every three chapters the character has, the character must take an extra flaw based upon those adventures. The character receives the extra trait for this flaw.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2005, 11:49:13 PM by MoonHunter »
MoonHunter
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Offline MoonHunter

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Resolution w or w/o dice
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2004, 02:23:09 AM »
With dice resolution:
Determine the number of dice.
Roll each die. Apply aspect trait modifiers
Every roll above half, you have one success.
Resolve

Without dice resolution:
Determine your Level
Give or receive karma points to increase/ decrease your level.
Resolve


10) Dice Resolution
a) Determine the number of dice rolled.
If any member of that race can attempt the action, +1D
If any member of this archetype/ profession can attempt the action (having the requisite skills +1D
For every skill trait the character has that applies to the action +1D

So a Swordsman (archetype) with Skilled with Broadsword trait using a broadsword (which anyone can try to do) would have three dice. If he had a well practiced with swords trait, he would have four.

b) Roll dice. Do not tally up, keep them seperate. So if you roll 4d10, you would not get 24, you would get a 4, 8, 7, 5.

c) Determine if you have any aspect traits that apply to the action. If they do, add the modifier to each die.

If using D10,
+1 if you have one aspect trait that apply
+2 if you have two aspect traits that apply
+3 if you have four aspect traits that apply
+4 if you have six aspect traits that apply

If using D6
+1 if you have two aspect trait that apply (or one applies really well)
+2 if you have four aspect traits that apply
+3 if you have seven aspect traits that apply

Example: Using D10, if your character had one aspect applicable.
You would have 5, 9, 8, 6.

d) Every die which is greater than half (6 or better d10, 4 or better d6) you gain one level of success. One success is enough for average actions. More complicated or resisted actions require more than one success to succeed. Each additional complication normally adds one more successful die roll to succeed at the action.

Example: Before the aspect mod, there was only 4, 8, 7, 5, for two successes. After the aspect mod, there is 5, 9, 8, 6, for three success.

*opposed actions: Some actions have a person or thing taking actions against you. Their number of successes plus one, is the number of successes you need to complete the action.

11) Diceless Resolution
a) Determine the Level of Success
If any member of that race can attempt the action, +1 Level
If any member of this archetype/ profession can attempt the action (having the requisite skills +1 Level
For every skill trait the character has that applies to the action +1 Level

So a Swordsman (archetype) with Skilled with Broadsword trait using a broadsword (which anyone can try to do) would have three levels of success. If he had a well practiced with swords trait, he would have four.

b) The GM determines the amount of success that is needed.
A minor success needs one
an average success needs two
a good success needs three.
Each additional complication adds one to the number of successes needed.

c) Karma Level:  A character can influence their level of success based upon their personal karma.  This karma can only be applied to actions/ responses that are significant to the story.  The basic transaction is one karmic point used effects the level of success for the action.  So by spending one karma point, you can increase your level of success for the action by one.  Upto three points can be spent at any time.  

You can built up karma points too, by reducing the level of success by one, you get an extra point.  Up to three points can be socked away this way.    

Now characters with appropriate aspects for the action can get more effect per karma point used.  

+1 if you have no aspect traits to apply to the action.
+2 if you have one aspect trait that apply
+3 if you have three aspect traits that apply
+4 if you have five aspect traits that apply
+5 if you have eight aspect traits that apply

Recovery: .  But since this is karmic, each karma point expended must be balanced out.
A) The character reduces the level of success for an important action by one, recovers one point.  Multiple points can be recovered by reducing the effect.  
b) The character gifts an opponent with a karma point, this recovers one point.  The GM can opt to "pull points".  This can only be done if the character is several points down, or is not recoving or utilizing the negative point.  
c) The character can "burn off the karma".  They spend an impulse (and important post or a full round of actions) not utilizing karma effects. Every impulse after - that they character does not use karma, one negative karma point dissipates.

But I need the karma point NOW.  If the character is currently in negative points, but needs to spend a point now, can do it.  The cost is doubled.  

In a forum game, the player would simply list their karma at the end of the post...  Normally all the mechanics are listed there at the end of the beautiful story post.

Karma -2 (two uses)
Karma +1 (earned back a point)
MoonHunter
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Offline MoonHunter

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Things you might want to calculates and Combat
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2004, 03:41:11 AM »
Attribute Action
Any action based solely upon innate abilities, utilized one for species, and one for every appropriate aspect trait, and three for any skill trait appropriate to the action.  


Things to calculate
Spot:  The total of any sense related trait, aspect INT

Initiative: 1 for race. 1 for any combat orriented archetype. 1 for any aspect related to speed.  

Combat/ Offense: 1 for race. 1 for any combat orriented archetype. 1 for any combat trait.

Combat/ Defense: 1 for race. 1 for any combat orriented archetype. 1 for any combat trait.

Resistance: 1 for race. 1 for any trait that applies to toughness.  1 die per level of armor.  

Combat:
EAch round, determine initiative. This order is a bit fluid in a play by post.

Normally a character gets one offensive and one defensive action each "round".  If they take more than one action, every extra action generates a cumlative -1D/ Level penalty.

So if the character runs to cover and then shoots, the attack will be at a
-1D/ level.  

An attack action is combat/ attack is resisted by target's combat, defense.

Damage is generated by the weapon, aspected by Physical (if melee) or Dexterity (if firearm).  

Weapons rate from one to five. Using blades as an example: one being a dagger, five being a huge mucking sword.  
Fire Arms run from two to six, from 22s to 50 cals.  

(Scale is important.  Vehicle weapons are five times more dice... so if you get hit by a 2d vehicle weapon, it does 10 dice to your poor character.  )

Damage vs Resistance.  Each success beyond resistance generates damage.
Every whole three points of damage through, generates a -1D or Level of Success Penalty to any act.  

If a character can take NO action, i.e. their total dice, plus damage penalty, is zero or less, for every action, they are incompacitated.

The player can opt to be unconscious at any time they have taken two or more levels/ dice of damage.  

Characters "die" only if the player says so. Though, they should take some form of lasting effect from the damage.

Fatigue
Each turn of full exertion, generates one point of fatigue.  Like damage, every full three points of fatigue, generates a -1D/Level

Now if this is for certain magic systems, substitute the word Power for Fatigue.  Every three castings generates a -1D/Level to all spell actions.
This will quickly disable all but the most skilled magic users.
MoonHunter
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"The world needs dreamers to give it a soul."
"And it needs realists to keep it alive."
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Offline MoonHunter

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Example Characters
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2004, 04:08:03 AM »
Name: Corwin the Green
Archetype:  Ranger
Species: Human

1) Chapter:The Orren War -He is a vetran of this five year long war.  This war was started by a blackhearted wizard in the Orren court.  It damaged both countries.
2) Chapter:The Attack at Odwald Keep: This is one of the decisive battles of the war.  112 men held out for 20 days against a force of 5000.  People who were there are held in awe.  

Generals
1) Deceptively Strong: Character appears thin, short, and weak, but is stronger than most people. (aspect)
2) Can run down any game: The famous Ranger endurance (aspect)
3) Penetrating Green Eyes: They are a memorable and engaging feature (aspect)
4) Scars over his body: Souvineers from previous combat encounters he has survived... he will survive.. he is that tough.  (aspect)
5) Penetrating Green Eyes: He has exceptional vision.
6) Expert Tracker: Better than most Rangers.
7) Longbowman: He has master the LongBow of the Northmen
8-9) Ranger (Group Training) This trait is required to keep him from being merely a woodsman.  Now he is a King's Ranger, an elite forrest unit.
10) Archer's squint: Ability with a bow.  
------
11) He was in the Bowman Line at many a battle
12) Military Wit: A knowledge of tactics and strategy
------
13) Spotting Movement
14) Famous Rep:  Was a warrior at Odwald

Flaw:
Distrusts "city folk"
Irrational Hatred of the Orren

Init: 3 (Human, Ranger, #8-9)
Spot: 3/5(Human, Rangers (rangers are known to be keen and perceptive), #8-9), with sight add #5/ #13
Attack-Bow 6 (Human, Ranger, #8-9, #7, #10, #11
Attack-Sword 3 (Human, Ranger, #8-9)
Defend  3 Human, Ranger, #8-9)
Resist- 5 Human, Ranger, #8-9, #2, #4)

Tracking: 3    Ranger, #8-9, #6
Riding: 1  Human

************************************************************

Name: Moss
Archetype: Ryder
Species: Human

1) Dragon Fast reflexes: Aspect
2) Quick: One of the terms most used to describe him. Aspect
3) Lightning fast: One of the other terms used to descrive him. Aspect
4) Quicker than a Zhan: Aspect
5) Nimble: A compliment to the quick. Aspect
6) Acrobatic Ryder
7) Crossbow is favorite weapon: Good with the weapon
8) Tourney trained: Is skilled at all the tournament ryder events
9) Tumbles and flips: He is quite the acrobat
10) Party Animal:  He is the life of the party.
11) Spear from the saddle: He is quite adept at lancing and throwing a spear while ryding.

Flaw: Flashy - he will often stop paying attention and
Flaw: Nemesis - Bad Guy Wing, and it is personal

Init 7  Human, Ryder, #1-5  If he does not go first, nobody does.
Sense 1   Normal Human
Attack-other   2    Human, Ryder,
Attack-spear   3    Human, Ryder, #11
Attack-Crossbow 3 Human, Ryder, #7
Defend- 2
Resist - 2

************************************************************

Name: CatcherofMysticWindfromtheHotWest
Archetype: Mage
Race: Elventi

1) Graceful Aspect
2) Elven Magic Gift in full: Aspect
3-4) Quick of wits and hands: Aspects for Mental and Dexterity
5) Arial hand:  Wind based telekensis -(Power requires incantation and gesture)
6) Wind's call: Weather manipulation -(Power requires incantation and gesture)
7) Scrying: Seeing anywhere the wind goes.  This is not just poetic, if the wind touches the area, this spell can see it. (Power)
8) Expert in the glass: Scrying done through glass  Scrying with a glass sphere or mirror. (Power- requires glass or mirror, can not use smoke, or ponds, or anything else)
9) Martial experience with Staff
10) Knowledge of mystic lore

Flaw: Foppish

Init:  3  (Elf, #1, #4)
Spot  1  (Elf)
Attack- 1/2 Elf /Staff
Defend 1/2 Elf/ Staff
Resist  1

Scry  3/4  (Elf, Mage, #8/#7 4 if both traits come into play)
Wind's Hand 3  (Elf, Mage, #5)

************************************************************
Name: The EbonKnight- aka Simon Green
Archetype: Detective SuperHero
Species: Pure Human (recieves two extra traits for this, because they can not personal superpowers)

This superhero game starts with 8 general traits and several chapters... normally HighSchool, College, Origin, and one to two big events, if the character is old enough.  In this game, younger heroes can have more traits in super powers. The maximum number of traits in a specific super power is equal to six minus chapters.  This will include special item traits.    The characters all start with 10 super power traits.  A character can start play with upto five flaws.  

Chapter: Death of Parents
Chapter: College/ Training to Avenge them
Chapter: Travel the world, learning things
Chapter: Shadow Lord's invasion of this realm (A cross over series and important event in this world's history).  

General 8, +8 for Chapters, +2 for Pure Human, +3 for extra flaws   = 21
Flaws 1 +2 for Chapters, +2 extras flaws   = 5

1) Genius: Aspect
2) Olympic level athlete: Aspect
3) Trained Reflexes: Aspect
4) Detective's eye for the unusual:
5) Master of Atami-waza (Karate's more violent ancestor)
6) Apprenticed under the Great Miraculo: Stage Magician and Escape Artist
7) Trained by the finest Circus Acrobats:
8) Analytic Mind: A trained detective's mind
-----
9)  Driven: Emotional Aspect
10) Wealth:  Inheritance
-----
11) Criminology Genius: An intuitive understanding of the criminal mind and detective techniques
12) Chemistry:
-----
13) World Traveller: Knows something about everywhere in the world.
14) Wealth:  Good Investments And utilizing his intelligence, he increased the various company's holdings.  
-----
15) Commanding Presence: He can give orders to the mightiest being on the planet, and they will do what they are told.  
16) Reputation: World's Scariest SuperHero

17) Stealth of a Ninja: He was trained in Japan. While learning Atamiwaza (Karate's violent ancestor), he picked up stealth from his teacher
18) Intimidating: Villians are a cowardly lot, once they figure out that you are not going to just take them to the police.  
19) Always has a plan: Can spot or figure out what others are going to do and has a counter plan.
20) Meditation and BodyControl: Can push his body to the human limits.
21) Knowledge of the Atlas City

Flaw: Will Protect Innocents from Criminals
Flaw: Vigilante - No public acclaim or support.
Flaw: Always Scary in Heroic Identity, scares criminals, allies, and passerby
Flaw: Hunted by Rogue's Gallery  +1
Flaw: Hunted by The Madman  

SuperPowers:
1-2) The Crypt: His secret underground base filled with useful equipment and secret passages to the surface.  It is built in a "lost" subway station.
3-4) The DarkRide: This super fast vehicle is filled with tons of offensive and defensive gadgets.  While not as fast as the Mach 5, it has more toys.
5-6) Mini-Jet: This mini-jet allows him to patrol from the sky and travel to far away places quickly.  It also has stealth abilities.
7-8) Utility Belt: He has gadgets for every occasion. Mostly Smoke and Gas Bombs, a grapple projector, and some tools of the trade.
9) Armored Suit: Provides +3 Resistance
10) Gauntlets:  These add +3 to his hand to hand damage, can have special gimmicks installed in them.

Initiative   3
Spot         3  various other traits can apply
Attack       3
Defend      4 Attack plus acrobat
Resist       3+3

Sneak   3
Intimidate  5 Human +15,16,18+1 flaw
Deduction/Detective: 4    
Plan: 4
Wealth  3
MoonHunter
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"The world needs dreamers to give it a soul."
"And it needs realists to keep it alive."
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Offline MoonHunter

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Okay
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2004, 06:10:30 AM »
Now What do you all think?

I know the basics of this game work well for forum and adhoc table top play.  I have used it for both.  X-Com, a Star Trek Game, and a superhero one.  

I know it needs some polishing and expanding (which areas do you need me to do it before it makes sense).  The combat system I have listed is pretty spartan, but seems to work.  

What do you like about it?
What do you hate about it?
What would you use it for?
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Offline Iain

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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2004, 10:32:53 AM »
OK, to answer your questions in order:

What do you think

Overall it seems like a very good and workable, yet still simple and freeformish system. At first I was dubious, but after reading your sample characters it really came together.

What do you like about it?

The single thing I probably like most (possibly because it's innovative) is the diceless karma method of resolving things. This would work extremely well for play-by-email/forum games when dice-rolling can bcomes a bit annoying. Other things I like:
The fact that it has a built in system of flaws, meaning power gamers can't be too munchkin.
The way in which there are chapters which give traits, and the different types of traits. I also like the way you have to pay for "experience" bonuses (e.g. "a well known hero who is friends with the Duke" rather than just paying for stats).
It's easily adapted to an system.

What do you hate about it?

Well nothing really, but there were some bits I found confusing. To be honest, I found quite a lot of the initial bits quite confusing as to what you could and couldn't do: the examples helped quite a lot here but there are still some queries e.g. "*Traits should not be "duplicated", each one must be unique in its description. A character can not take four traits of "strong". it says in the "general traits" section of character creation, but Moss the Ryder seems to have done just that with his first four traits: certainly with (2) (3) and (4) as "Quick", "Lightning fast" and "Quicker than a Zhan" all seem the same (I'll give you that "Dragon fast reflexes" might be slightly different.

I think that is my only real criticism.

What would you use it for?

Although you said it works well for table top play, I wouldn't use it for that. This isn't a fault of the system, merely that when I'm GMing table top games I like to use a more rigorous system with well definined rules/stats  etc. than a more free-form style (my current major system is 180+ pages long and growing). This is just a style of play; if I was playing in a table-top game in which the GM was using a more free-form system then I would be as happy to use this one as any other free-formish system I've played in.

What I might well use it for is in a forum or email based game where detailed rules are an obstruction. I've had little experience at running or playing in these; therefore I might well use this system, at least until I had got enough experience to create my own (for me, at least half the fun in GMing is making the system (it's why I first started GMing: I had a system and wanted to test it) so using another person's would only ever be a temporary measure). Again, if I was looking for a forum/email based game to play in and found one in which someone was using this system, then I would be very happy to play in it: it seems as good as any I have seen for that type of game.
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Offline MoonHunter

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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2004, 02:18:11 AM »
Quote from: "Iain"
. "*Traits should not be "duplicated", each one must be unique in its description. A character can not take four traits of "strong". it says in the "general traits" section of character creation, but Moss the Ryder seems to have done just that with his first four traits: certainly with (2) (3) and (4) as "Quick", "Lightning fast" and "Quicker than a Zhan" all seem the same (I'll give you that "Dragon fast reflexes" might be slightly different.


Each one is a Dexterity orriented aspect trait, but each one has a different phrase that captures that aspect.  You could not write fast, fast and get two dex aspects.  Try coming up with a number of descriptors for someone with fast reflexes, and you will discover how hard it is.  Note: one of players previously called the game "Thesaurus", for just that reason.  I have to admit, I use the simple play style.  ..

The X-Com play group tended toward phrases with explanations at traits.  Rather than drop a word or simple short phrase, they would put either a) a quote, b) a long phrase that described their history, or c) a metaphor, with the colon and an explanation of what the game mechanic was.

"So there I was...": Lots of Military Experience
"Quicker than a coondog on hot blacktop": Dexterity Aspect
"We were 40 klicks from Mai-chong, marching..: Endurance aspect
"See that black speck over there... *blat*: Sniper skill

When you are writing just one character, you can invest this kind of effort.  As a GM, I admit, I tend to gloss it over a bit.  So noted.

This style takes more time and effort to do, as the player has to invest more effort into the character; writing more of a story snippet, than generating a game mechanic.
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Offline Iain

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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2004, 03:09:47 AM »
Ah, I see what you mean. That does make sense. The phrase style does seem very good, as it makes the character do a background (or at least set down some starting blocks he can build a background on) as he's working out the type of character he wants to play.

The thesaurus thing is also quite good - a character is limited by the number of different words the player can think of!
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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2004, 04:53:19 PM »
Well...
I like it.
I don't really understand the whole 'chapters' thing, and I would need your help to make a character, but I still think that it has great merit.
It is very well-though-out and put-together, and only the phrasing of certain parts of the writing makes it difficult.
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Offline MoonHunter

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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2004, 01:33:41 AM »
Chapters are "as in an important chapter of the character's life".  

Chapters are the experience system for this game.  After each important runs/ story arcs, or three or so regular complete adventures, you get a chapter.  This grants the character two traits.  

This game allows for "experience before play", allowing huge periods of their life to count towards their development.  If the event would be worthy of a story, (The ranger's war and Alamo-esk story for example), it grants a chapter for them.

As for creating a character...
* Choose a name, archetype (see list), and race (see list)
* Choose 10 descriptive traits that define who and what the character is.
Four of them must be aspects, describing "attributes" or innate abilities.
Four of them must be skill traits, related to what the character can do well.
The other traits can describe skills, aspects, or special things like perks, reputations, special equipment, etc.
*Choose one flaw.

You don't need chapters or super powers...
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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2004, 07:28:17 AM »
Incredible Idea!! I have been slowly digesting it a bit at a time. You will hear from me again on this topic. I want to try it.

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Offline MoonHunter

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Orderly Structure
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2004, 04:42:11 AM »
Better Flow:  Character examples along way...

0.0 Intro-

1.0 Character Creation

1.1 Conception- Come up with a character idea (or set of ideas)

1.2 Archetype/ Species/ Milieu  These are the three primary traits.  You may choose one from a GM provided list or with the GM's approval substitute something.  Archetypes are the most flexible, Milieu (the world the character lives in) is the least. Species may or may not be flexible depending on the milieu or campaign

    Each of these primary traits defines basic abilities. They grant one D(egree)

1.3 Select General Traits:
The character has 10 traits (unless changed by GM)

Each trait should be a short phrase, with an explanation of what the phrase does.  The phrase could be a description or a piece of dialog (in character).

Each traits falls into one of four categories:

1.3.1 Aspect (attribute)
1.3.2 Ability (skill)
1.3.3 Specials (Perks/ social standings/ equipment special, etc)
1.3.4 Power.

1.4 Flaws

1.5 Chapters
1.5.1 PreGame Experience
1.5.2 Game Experience

1.6 Clean Up..
1.6.1 Character Rolls
Init, Sense, Offense, Defense, Resist, Other important skills
1.6.2 History

1.7  GM variations?
1.7.1 Build by Chapters: fewer initial general traits, more required chapters. Required chapters do not generate flaws.

2.0 Resolutions
Most actions are automatic, but only those that are in dramatic situations need to be resolved with game mechanics

Storypath can use dice or a diceless mechanic to resolve said actions

Swipe part of Intro for this second paragraph. It all revolves around Ds.
D= Degrees of Chance

2.1 First Steps: Determine Ds
The more traits, the more chances of success.

Checklist
Species, Archetype, Ability or Special Traits, Milieu (-1d)

Give example with Tholcrum, Human, Swashbuckler, Master Swordsman, and Rapier vs using a mace 2d, broadsword 3d, rapier 4d, handgun 1d

2.1.1 First steps: Determine Aspect
From Aspect Area

2.1.2 First Steps: Complications require extra successes (environmental, personal, complexity, situational)

2.1.3 First Steps: Determine possible results
Fail
Basic Success- the one success beyond any resistance
Full Success- additional successes brings...

2.2  Dice Resolution
1D becomes 1D10
>6
example

2.2.1 Aspect Modifiers
2.2.2 Resisted
2.2.3 1s and 10s

2.3 Diceless Resolution
2.3.1 Karma Points (Aspect)
2.3.2 Resisted

2.4 Additional Resolution
Attribute DRs
Tasks
Reaction

3.0 Combat/ Tactical
3.1 Initiative

3.2 Actions
3.2.1 Move
3.2.2 Attack  
3.2.3 Defend
If success of attack is greater than defend, apply damage

3.2.4 Other  Odd actions

3.3 Damage phase
3.3.1 Damage  Weapon's Dice, plus one per extra success3.3.2 Resistance  Character's Resistance
3.3.3 Effects   . Each success does one point of damage
Each three success of damage, generates a -1D for actions.  
When reaches 0 for actions being used, the character is incapacitated.  
(player can opt to be incapacitated at any time)

3.4 Fatigue

3.5 Small generic list of weapons

4.0 Power
4.1 Power Traits: Description of effect the GM can accept
4.1.1 Restriction  Each trait must have a limit or restriction, some based on special effect: Gesture/ Incantation for magic.
4.2 Power Action:
4.3 Power Resistance
4.4 Manna (Fatigue

5.0 Super Powers
5.1 Power traits on steroids. No roll required to activate, just to target.  
5.2 Multiple Traits to effect
5.3 Normally there is a number of super power traits you can have
5.3.1 Exchange rate
5.4 Natural Powers: Certain races have special abilities that add to the cost of the given trait.  

See genre examples... super hero, cyberware, elemental powers for a fantasy game.

6.0 World Creation/ Character Examples/ GM instructions


Glossary: Experience system see 1.5.2
Ds Short for Degrees of Success or Dice depending on dice or diceless resolution.
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Offline MoonHunter

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StoryPath: 0.0 Intro
« Reply #12 on: May 20, 2004, 05:48:16 AM »
Storypath is a roleplaying game suitable for play by post or table top usage for all genres. The basic mechanics can be immediately adapted to the GM's needs for the campaign.  The system itself centers on descriptive traits built up over the various chapters of the character's life. Each trait describes some element of the character, be it a natural ability, a learned skill, a super power, or some other odd element of the character.  The traits both define the character and determine its ability to do things.  

Intuitively, the more traits that apply to an action, the easier it is for the character to succeed at said action.  Each trait that applies to an action generates a "D".  For a diceless game, Ds are Degrees. For dice based games, they are Dice. The total Ds for each action are determined, dice are thrown or degrees of success are calculated, and play continues.

Over play, the character expereinces new chapters in its life, gaining more and different traits (and an occasional negative trait or flaw).  The character's story continues, down the campaign path.  


Summation
Character Creation
* Choose a name, archetype, race, and milieu that are on the GM provided list or acceptable to the game being played.
* Choose 10 general traits (or number defined by the GM) that define who and what the character is.  Four of them must be aspects, describing "attributes" or innate abilities. Four of them must be skill traits, related to what the character can do well. The other traits can describe skills, aspects, or special things like perks, reputations, special equipment, etc.
*Choose one flaw, some problem that dogs the character.
*Choose any required or desired chapters, determining the general traits and flaw traits appropriately.  

Resolution- Dice
*Determine number of applicable traits.
*Roll dice
*Apply Aspect MODs
*Determine Results

Resolution-Diceless
*Determine number of applicable traits.
*Determine Degree of effort
*Apply Karma Points, if desired.
*Determine results
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Offline MoonHunter

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1.0 Character Creation
« Reply #13 on: May 21, 2004, 05:24:02 AM »
1.0 Character Creation

1.1 Conception
A character's conception is the controlling idea(s) behind the character.  The conception helps in creating and playing the character. Initially, the conception is just one or two key ideas about the character.  Those ideas serve as the foundation for the character. Every other decision made about the character is based upon those idea.   The conception is eventually expanded into the character’s history and personality, as well as traits and abilities

First, ask your GM about the world you are playing in. Have them give you a brief synopsis or read their GM world pack. Have the GM explain what the other characters in the game are, so you know what you are getting in with.

Secondly, think about what things will be important about the character you play.  Those form your key/ foundation ideas.

Lastly, To build up your conception, answer the questions listed below. If it seems like a great deal, it really isn't. Just take it a small bit at a time. Work on the areas that you think are important, then slowly backfill the areas that you think are not. You do not need to fill these out completely before you pick all your traits, but you should be able to answer them after you have.  

Feel free to make changes to sections you had previously answered, if something else inspires a better answer. Feel free to change things about so it all make sense. Just make sure it is all complete and consistent before game begins.

1.1.1 Questions Proper:
1) Who is your character and where do they come from?
Ask your game master for what regions or states you can come from and what kind of names they have in those regions.

2) What do you look like? Height, Weight, Hair/ Skin/ Eye color, and any distinctive features you might have. This should include your age, which needs to be adjusted for your race.  Think about what your character is like physically.

3) What is your character like emotionally and mentally. i.e. his/ her/ its personality.

4) What is your family like? Who are they and what do they do? Do not forget extended family AND Friends.

5) What did your learn to do when you were younger? People tend to pick up skills and knowledge from their family and friends, as well as where they live.

6) What were you apprenticed as? What job/ profession did your parents set you down the road to become? .

7) How did you become a member of your current profession or calling? Ask your game master if there are any special processes to becoming what you are.

8) What was your training to be your current profession/ calling? Who did you get to know while you were training?

9) Why are you currently doing what you are doing? Why are you adventuring?

10) Who are the people you are adventuring with? How do you know them? Did you meet them previously? Did you meet through a friend?

11) What is your initial opinions about your adventuring companions.
10 and 11 you will need to work out with your fellow players. Maybe you will find out that you were neighbors when you were younger. Maybe you met briefly at a party...

The more you know about your character, the other characters, and the world around you, the EASIER it is to play a character.

1.2 Primary Traits
There are three primary traits: Archetype, Species, and Milieu.  You must choose one of each from a GM provided list or with the GM's approval substitute something.

1.2.1 The Archetype Trait:
This is the character’s profession or calling.  Each profession or calling comes with an assumed set of skills and training. When performing some action related to the character’s archetype, the character receives 1D.  

Certain archetypes might require a character to take specific traits: Elven archers require the character to take the Elven trait, Fleet Officers require the Loyal to Fleet flaw, or Rangers might require the character take the Ranger Training trait.  Check with the GM if there are any requirements for a given archetype.  

Examples for a Generic Fantasy World:
Fighter, Mage, Cleric, Rogue.

Examples for a Euro Medieval Fantasy Game:
Knight, Squire, Lady, Woodsman, Druid, Priest.

Examples for a Nipponese Fantasy (All assumed to be Samurai class)
Bushi, Shugenja, Gushuko.

Example for a FutureNoir game:
Networker, Blade, Face, Media, Suit, Drone

Examples for Kerren: http://www.rpgcitadel.com/guild/index.php?board=26.0
Ryder, Edge, Wing Leader, Scale, Crafter, Noble.

Examples for Modern:
Doctor, Lawyer, Actor, Engineer, Spy, Hacker, and so on...


1.2.2 The Species Trait:
This is species your character is.  The default for most games is “Humanâ€?, with no option of taking anything else. Certain campaigns will allow for other species: Elves, Dwarves, Tiger-Men, Angels, Werewolves, Dorians, or what ever. A given species might have certain advantages and disadvantages inherent to them. Most of these are expressed as traits. In some cases these are “free traitsâ€? that the character receives that are separate from their general traits.  In others, the character must “payâ€? a number of general traits to be a member of that race and have all the required abilities (and flaws). Either way, these traits are normally independent of any regular restrictions. Note: the cost is dependent upon the campaign (a werewolf trait in one campaign might cost you nothing extra, but in another campaign would cost you three general traits).  

Any action that any member of the species can perform gets 1D from the species trait.  

Examples:
Werewolf: Three Traits Claws, Fur (Resistance), and Regeneration. Requires character to transform into wolf mode before using.  3 traits
Dwarves: Tough as Stone, Flaw: Unable to cast spells: 0 traits
Goblins: Flaw: Hated by all, Flaw: Small, Trait: Night Vision: Bonus 1 Trait


1.2.3 The Milieu Trait:
This trait defines the world and time period the character comes from. In most cases, every character in a campaign will have the same one.  It is only in time travel/ dimension travel games that this become important.

1.3 General Traits:
General traits define the bulk of the character.  They define what a character can do and how they do it.  Each trait will have two parts: phrase and explanation. The phrase is normally a colorful description, or character quote, or at its most staid a tangible listing, that suggests/ implies/ defines what the character can do.  The explanation describes what the phrase is getting at.  Each category will have examples that will clarify it for you.

Keep in mind a specific trait should never be repeated on a character. You can not take the trait “Strongâ€?: Able to life stuff four times to be really strong.  If you want to be really strong, you will need to choose four traits that describe, explain, or imply the character’s strength: Well Muscled, Herculean strength, “Always in the Gym pumping ironâ€?, “I have never taken Steroids.. it is all geneticâ€? (describing their physical aspect), would be substitutes.  

A character normally starts with 10 general traits. (The GM may opt for a different number). Each general trait falls into one of four categories: Aspect, Ability, Special, and Power.  A character should have four aspect and four ability traits

1.3.1 Aspect Traits
Aspect traits are traits that define the character innate abilities. This would cover physical (strength, endurance, and health), dexterial (speed, agility, manual dexterity), mental (wit, reason, and memory), emotional (willpower, empathy, etc), metaphysical (luck, power, and magical aptitude), and charismatic (appearance, influence, and charisma). Aspect traits seldom add Ds, they usually modify how the action is resolved.

Examples:
�Ripped�: Physically Strong -Physical Aspect
“Hard as a Mountain�: Able to withstand punishment and endure fatigue – Physical Aspect.
"An intelligent gleam in the eyes":  Mental Aspect"
“Mesmerizing Eyes�: Charisma Aspect
“Has "IT": A Charismatic Aspect that comes from a movie term for having stage presence
"Olympic Body Builder": Massive Muscles - Physical Aspect
"Catlike": Moves with the grace and balance of a cat. Dexterital Aspect
“Catlike: Mystical sensitivities of a cat- Metaphysical Aspect
�Lucky of the Irish: Fates favored- Metaphysical Aspect
"Quicker than a coondog on hot blacktop": A quote explaining Dexterity Aspect
"We were 40 klicks from Mai-chong, marching..: The character has many stories about his endurance - Endurance aspect


1.3.2 Ability (skill)
Ability traits are traits that define area of skill and ability that the character excels at. What traits are possible depends on the milieu the character is from.  They are normally categories of what can be done, but specific and very specific act traits are possible (Knightly weapons, swordsman, and broadsword for example). Every trait that applies to an action generates 1D.  

Certain skills will have prerequisites. For example: You must learn to fly an aircraft in general, before you can fly a fighter plane. A character must have a general aircraft flying trait before they can take jet craft of fighter craft pilot traits. Some times an archetype can be substituted. The archetype pilot grants the ability to fly an aircraft. The GM and the Player will work out any prerequisites required.  

Examples:
“Master of Flashing Blades�: Swords skills, with emphasis on flashy
“Excellent trail cook�: Can cook well in the wilds
�Hotshot Pilot�: knows how to fly airplanes and related craft
�Top Gun Graduate�: able to fly a fighter jet craft well (requires ability to pilot first)
"So there I was...": Tons of military stories showing his vast Military Experience.
"See that black speck over there... *blat*: Sniper skill
�Ex-militaryman�: Knowledge of military procedures and basic military skills.
Greatsword Expert: knowledge and usage of great sword.
�Hmmm. It went this way�: Tracker, can follow prey in the wilds
�Skilled at Jacking�: Ability to use virtual reality computers via netjack
�Slipping the Ice�: Ability to avoid anti-personnel/ security software in VR.


*Optional: Group Skills: Certain groups of skills come in packages of training. This would be intensive training (like Special Op training or Fleet Academy) or the apprenticeship (training for a specific archetype). These traits cost two traits to take. However, they add 1D to a wide variety of work

Examples:
“Attended Camp Harrison�: Special Ops Training
“Spent time in NASA�: Astronaut Training
“Member of the Crimson Guard�: Battle Mage training
“Time in the Temple�: Priestly Training: Note this trait grants both knowledge of clerical magic prayers as well as cleric theurgical acts, just as if the character had the Priest archetype.
“Fleet Academy class of 27�: Fleet Officer Training.


1.3.3 Specials
Special Traits describe other gifts and abilities a character might have. These can be prerequisites/ perks of the job, wealth, social rank, contacts, special equipment (master sword, a Lear jet), special talents (such as eidetic memory, mage sight, perfect pitch, double jointed), access to special powers not normally available to that archetype (Mage/ Esper/ etc), and special skills (specific spells or psionic effects). Most of these require a single trait to take, like normal.  The GM might require additional cost for certain traits.

Examples
“License to Kill�: The agency will sanction any action the character takes
“Attended all the right schools�: Knows many people in the upper crust.
“Invested Well�: Wealth
“Old Money�: Wealth�
“127th in line for the Throne�: Member of the British Aristocracy
President and CEO of Tandcor: Owns his own multinational company
“Eyes like Chuck Yeager�: Character can see details at incredible distances.
“Double Jointed: Can bend in many odd ways.
“Has the Sight�: Can see spirits and magic.


1.3.4 Power.
Power traits allow character to generate effects beyond what is normally possible for a character with a successful Power roll.  The explanation of each power trait gives the game effects of said power trait.  Every power trait must have a “catchâ€? or some limit that prevents it from being all powerful.  Most spell traits have the limit requires hands to gesture and voice to incant. Psionics often require moments of concentration before use. Witch traits requires magical tools to use. The sources are limitless.

A character is restricted to power traits appropriate to both the genre AND their type of power.  The type of power is based either on their archetype (Wizard, Esper, Witch, Mentat) or a special trait (Magegift, Esper talent, Wicca blessed, Mentat training- and said special traits normally cost two traits). Most GMs will list a number of “averageâ€? power traits for each type of power in their game.  

One last thing, if a character’s archetype is power oriented, power traits count as ability traits for the four trait minimum.  

Example:
"Eldritch Bolts":3D of glowing mystic energy -(Power requires incantation and gesture)
"Serriphanic shields": 3D resistance against attacks the target is aware of. -(Power requires incantation and gesture)
"Ariel's hand": Wind based telekensis -(Power requires incantation and gesture)
"Wind's call": Weather manipulation -(Power requires incantation and gesture)
"Scrying": Seeing anywhere the wind goes. This is not just poetic, if the wind touches the area, this spell can see it. (Power)
"Empathy":The ability to perceive and change emotions- (Power - No control, will activate on its own.)
"Astreal form": The ability to send an invisible astreal form - (Power, limited to one minute at a time).

 
1.4 Flaws
Nobody is perfect, everyone has some complication in their life. Every character must have at least one flaw and it should be a moderate one that interferes with their adventuring existence from time to time.  A flaw could be a physical challenge, an intense allergy, a missing skill (like literacy in a literate society or Driving in the early 21st century), a psychological issue (fear, compulsion, limiting personal codes, impulse control), ill fated in some aspect of their life (unlucky with women, or always in trouble with the principle), obedience to a higher power or patron (works for the CIA, member of a cyberpunk corporation) some social issue (member of a hated minority group, some unusual habit,), a personal nemesis (the mob, some mad villain, your evil twin) or a reputation among people.  

A character can have more than one flaw. Every extra flaw taken generates one general trait.  If the flaw more than moderately impairs the character, it is worth two general traits (parapalegic, blind (without super powers to compensate), hunted by all the world's police forces, nemesis of the Assassin's guild, etc). A character can normally start with up to three flaws.  

Flaws that come from Chapters in the character’s pre game life, do count towards the three flaw starting maximum.  If those flaws more than moderately impair the character (see above), the character does receive an extra trait for them.

“Wears an eyepatch�: Missing an eye- no peripheral or depth perception
“Illiterate�: Can not read
“Dyslexic�: Difficulty telling directions
“Must protect Innocents�: a personal rule that character must follow
“Can not kill�: a personal rule that character must follow
“Follows the Old Code: The character strictly adheres to the old code of chivalry
“Fear of enclosed spaces�:
“Company man�: Works for the CIA, must obey their directions
“Enemy of the Yakuza�: The Japanese Mob is their nemesis


1.5 Chapters
The term chapters comes from the phrase “Chapters in the character’s lifeâ€?.  These are important parts of the character’s life story, granting them experience and personal development (or change).  Every chapter of a character’s life will have a heading, explaining the chapter: High School, College, Defeating Torgon the Terrible, Time in the Service, Assignment to The Enterprise. Each chapter grants the character two general traits that the character developed during that time. As the character lives and adventures, they often develop personal complications (flaws).  Every two chapters the character has, generates one additional flaw.

1.5.1 PreGame Experience:
Some characters start their adventuring with some real experience under their belt, rather than being “fresh off the farmâ€?, “just out of schoolâ€?, or “freshly mintedâ€?. With the GM’s permission, they can take any appropriate number of chapters. Most GM’s limit it to three, but that will vary from campaign to campaign.  Some GMs will require characters to have chapters of previous history.

Note: Flaws generated by pregame experience DO NOT generate extra traits for the character.  The flaws should still be tied into the chapters in some way.  

Examples:
* Chapter: Parents killed by Mob hit before his eyes
1) "Totally Driven, Will do what ever it takes to 'get the job done'": Emotional Aspect
2) "Inheritance of family fortune": More money than anyone really needs.

* Chapter:The Orren War -He is a vetran of this five year long war. This war was started by a blackhearted wizard in the Orren court. It damaged both countries.
1) He was in the Bowman Line at many a battle: skill at battle archery
2) Military Wit: A knowledge of tactics and strategy

* Chapter:The Attack at Odwald Keep: This is one of the decisive battles of the war. 112 men held out for 20 days against a force of 5000. People who were there are held in awe.
1) Spotting Movement on the enemy line: Good at spotting the enemy
2) Famous Rep: Was a warrior at Odwald 1D

The Flaw for the two Chapters was "A total hatred for the Orren". Though the Wizard was to blame, he blames the people who followed him.


1.5.2 Game Experience:
The character’s story continues into play as well. After a character completes one important story arc or is involved in three good stores, the GM should award the character one additional chapter.  This chapter should be named after the story arc OR after an important event/ period in the three stories.  This chapter can be “savedâ€? until an appropriate story event can be arranged in the campaign: A player wants to go off to collegium for a while, visit Old Man Chang for personal instruction, or take some time off for personal research.  

Note: The character receives the extra trait for the flaws generated by game experience chapters.

Examples:  

* Chapter: Recovered the Ark of the Covenant
1) "Belief in God or at least God's Power": Metaphysical Aspect
2) "A few more scars to go with the old ones": Just getting tougher and tougher. Physical Aspect

* Chapter: Defeating Various SuperVillians: (BlackClaw, Wipeout, and Dr Chaos)
1) "Improved control over Plasma powers": Skill at using powers
2) "Friends with the Swat Team": He has contacts with the police, especially the swat team.

*Chapter: Defeated the Night Ninjas
1) "My hands are lethal weapons": Through his training, the character can now hit with 2d damage in unarmed combat.
2) "What an incredible smell we have found": Knowledge of the sewers and undercity of San Francisco


1.5.3 Building Up by Chapters.
A character can be built up chapter by chapter.  When building a 10 general trait character, you can consider the character’s five life chapters that occurred. Each trait is then associated with a period in the character’s life.  These five chapters only have to generate one flaw trait. This process helps solidify the character for the player, as they know every important element of the character.

Some GM’s will build upon this concept.  They will start the characters with fewer general traits (6 or 8) and require the characters to have one to five additional chapters.  Many characters in the same campaign will have the same chapter names, as they will have experienced the events together.

1.6 Trait Pools:
A trait pool is a number of extra traits set aside for a special purpose. These traits can only be used for the defined special purpose. A trait pool is used for things like super powers, cyberware (which are a form of super power), special equipment (magical items, super hero equipment, things people normally could not have), or extraordinary resources (a personal army, a reality altering computer, gun powder on a world without gunpowder).  The number of traits is based upon the GM and the campaign. It could be three traits for cyberware, or ten traits for super powers, or five points for magical artifacts.  It is really up to the GM.  

Some GM’s will allow traits to be swapped into and out of a trait pool.  Three general traits will often buy another trait in the pool and traits are traded out of the pool at a one to one ratio, but it is up to the GM.  

Example
PlasmaBlue: This Human appearing Android can burst into blue plasma fire. Can only use Plasma Powers when in flaming form. (10 traits)
1-3) Plasmabolt: 3D ranged attack
4-5) Float on thermal energy: His intense heat lifts him. He can hover and fly at running pace, indefinately (no fatigue for use)
6-8) Plasma Aura I: +2D Resistance as the plasma protects him from incoming attacks (no fatigue for use)
9-10)  Plasma Aura II: Flaming Plasma does 1D to anything that touches him. (No fatigue for use)

Fields's Cyberware: All cyberware has the "hardware" restriction, so it can be emped or disabled.  (5 trait pool)
1-2) Red Glowing Cyberoptic eye circa 2010: This antique (but so is Fields) has Thermographic and telescopic abilities
3-4) Wired Reflexes: 2D towards speed and dexterity aspects.
5) SkinWeave: Carbon Fibers under the skin grant him greater resistance +2D. It can easily be detected by touch or careful observation.

EbonKnight: A Detective superhero that strikes fear in his victims and the general public. Most of his powers are "items" which can be destroyed or taken away from him. (10 trait pool)

1-2) The Crypt: His secret underground base filled with useful equipment and secret passages to the surface. It is built in a "lost" subway station.
3-4) The DarkRide: This super fast vehicle is filled with tons of offensive and defensive gadgets. While not as fast as the Mach 5, it has more toys.
5-6) Mini-Jet: This mini-jet allows him to patrol from the sky and travel to far away places quickly. It also has stealth abilities.
7-8) Utility Belt: He has gadgets for every occasion. Mostly Smoke and Gas Bombs, a grapple projector, and some tools of the trade.
9) Armored Suit: Provides +3 Resistance -  
10) Gauntlets: These add +3 to his hand to hand damage, can have special gimmicks installed in them.



1.8  Clean Up
Clean Up refers to tidying up all the loose ends of the character.  This is the time the character is made ready for play.  The player should go over the character’s conception one more time to make sure it is sound.  Various numbers should be generated for ease of play.  The character’s final history should be generated, and any other details that will be useful in play should be written down.  Once the character is cleaned up, you are ready to start play.

1.8.1 Important Ds
There are a number of Ds that should be determined before play starts, so play will not be slowed down while you calculated them.  

Initiative (INIT):  1D for species, 1D for any combative archetype, and 1D for any trait dealing with dexterity, speed, or reflexes.  

Sense:  1D for species, generally. 1D for any archetype that relies on its senses (Detective, Forrester, Doctor), and 1D for any trait dealing with the senses.  If a specific sense is listed in the trait, a character might have several sense Ds, one general one and one for each specific sense.

Offense (OFF): 1D for species, 1D for any combative archetype, and 1D for any trait dealing with combat or a weapon.  If a trait defines a specific weapon, then several offensive Ds can be listed.  

Defense-Dodge (DOD): 1D for species, 1D for any combative archetype. 1D for any trait dealing with dexterity, speed, or reflexes, acrobatics, or full body movement

Defense-Parry (PRY): The Same as Offense

Resistance (RES): 1D for species, 1D for any combative archetype, and 1D for any trait dealing with toughness, endurance, and stamina.  If the character has armor or shields or some protection, there will normally be a +XDs added to resistance.  So a resistance 2 character with 3 resistance armor will have a RES of 2+3

*Power (POW): 1D for any magical archetype or power special, 1D for the power trait, and 1D for any trait dealing an appropriate power.

*Resistance-Metaphysical (R-POW): 1D for species, 1D for any magical archetype, and 1D for any trait dealing with metaphysical or spiritual strength.

1.8.2 Aspect Ds
Some GMs will use aspects frequently, so having them tabulated on your character sheet would be advantageous.  They are normally marked as 1(for species)+ number of appropriate aspect traits.  

1.8.3  History:
This would be a brief paragraph or two that sums up the character’s history.  There might be a longer, more detailed history available, but this would be a “short versionâ€? for ease of use.

1.8.4 Formal Character Sheet:
It is time to transfer all the notes, traits, and numbers into one easy to use format. Examples of the character sheets are seen in the character examples.
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Storypath 2.0 Resolution
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2004, 04:00:42 AM »
Most actions a character will perform are automatic or do not need game mechanics to resolve. The GM or the player will simply narrate what occurs.  Only those actions that are "dramatic", that there are real risks or consequences to the action that need to be resolved with game mechanics.  , but only those that are in dramatic situations need to be resolved with game mechanics.

It all revolves around traits. The more traits that apply to an action, the easier it is for the character to succeed at said action. Each trait (ability or special) that applies to an action generates a "D" or Degree of Chance. Each D increases the characters chance of succeeding at said action.  Unlike most games, Storypath provides a choice. A given game can use dice or a diceless mechanic to resolve said actions, it is up to the GM. Either way, the total Ds for each action are determined, dice are thrown or degrees of success are calculated, and play continues.


2.1 First Steps: Determine Ds
Every trait that applies generates D. For each action, go down the following checklist

1) Species Trait: Any action that any member of the species can perform gets 1D from the species trait. If the action requires special skills or training, then this action applies.  

2) Archetype Traits: Each profession or calling comes with an assumed set of skills and training. When performing some action related to the character’s archetype, the character receives 1D.

3) Ability or Special Traits: Each trait explains what it covers.  Each appropriate skill/ ability or special traits the character has applies 1D

4) Milieu Traits: This trait defines the world and time period the character comes from. That time and place determines what will be common or even possible skills.  If the character is performing an action that is not in keeping with their time or place (without special traits), they receive a -1D to the action.  This would be like a fantasy swashbuckler using a firearm, an imperial Roman driving a car (or trying), or a 21st century cyberpunk making fire with two sticks and a rock.

The Character Tholcrum has the following traits: Human, Swashbuckler, Master Swordsman, and Trained for years with Rapier at the finest schools.  His Milieu trait is Arth, a fantasy world with a technology equal to The Italian Renaissance period.

If Tholcrum uses a mace: 2D  
(Human and Swashbuckler- being a combative sort of archetype).

If Tholcrum uses a broadsword:  3D
(Human, Swashbuckler, Master Swordsman)

If Tholcrum uses a rapier: 4D   (Human, Swashbuckler, Master Swordsman, and Trained for years with Rapier at the finest schools.  )

If Tholcrum uses a pistol: 1D
(Human, Swashbuckler, -1D Milieu)



2.1.1 First steps: Determine Aspect
Every action utilizes some aspect of the character's natural ability. So determine which aspect and the number of traits that apply.  

Physical: strength, endurance, and health
Dexterial: speed, agility, manual dexterity
Mental: wit, reason, memory and perception
Emotional: willpower, empathy
Metaphysical: luck, power, and magical aptitude
Charismatic: appearance, influence, and charisma

2.1.2 *First Steps: Complications
Every action is not always simple.  Each notable Complications, be it due to an adverse environment, the complexity of the task, due to personal complications (physical and occasionally psychological), adds one D of resistance, increasing the number of Ds to succeed by one.

2.1.3 First Steps: Results of the action
The GM should consider for an instant what will occur if the action fails, achieves a basic success (1 more success than the resistance), or a full success (two or more levels of success than the resistance).


2.2 Dice Resolution
For Each D generated, the character rolls 1d10.  Each roll of six or greater, becomes one success.

Roll 4d10, you would not get 24, you would get a 4, 8, 7, 5.  For two successes.

The action is said to succeed IF the character scores one more success than any resistance. Usually there is no resistance (from another character OR complications), so the character only needs to score one success to succeed.

2.2.1 Aspect Modifiers
Each appropriate aspect trait does make the action easier. Aspect traits add to the roll of the die, making it easier to succeed.

+1 if you have one aspect trait that apply
+2 if you have two aspect traits that apply
+3 if you have four aspect traits that apply
+4 if you have six aspect traits that apply

If the character had one aspect applicable, you would have 5, 9, 8, 6. for three successes.

2.2.2 Resisted actions
Sometimes actions are opposed by other characters.  The classic oppositions are attacks and defenses and sneaking and spotting.  To succeed against the defending character, the character must achieve one more success than the defending character.  So if the sneaking character makes three successes while hiding/sneaking, a seeking/searching character must achieve four successes to find them.  
 
2.2.3 1s and 10s
This is an optional rule that adds variation to the game.  

If the die roll is a natural 1, it subtracts one successful die.  This addition allows characters with huge Ds for an action to still possibly fail.

If the die roll is a natural 10, roll another die. This grants any character the chance to succeed at any action, if they can roll enough natural 10s.

2.3 Diceless Resolution
Every D becomes a Degree of Chance.  That level is compared against the resistance to the action

A minor success needs one
A basic success needs two
A full success needs three.
Each additional complication adds one to the number of successes needed.

2.3.1 Karma Level
A character can influence their level of success based upon their personal karma. This karma can only be applied to actions/ responses that are significant to the story. The basic transaction is one karmic point used effects the level of success for the action. So by spending one karma point, you can increase your level of success for the action by one. Upto three points can be spent at any time.

You can built up karma points too, by reducing the level of success by one, you get an extra point. Up to three points can be socked away this way.

Now characters with appropriate aspects for the action can get more effect per karma point used.

+1 if you have no aspect traits to apply to the action.
+2 if you have one aspect trait that apply
+3 if you have three aspect traits that apply
+4 if you have five aspect traits that apply
+5 if you have eight aspect traits that apply

2.3.2 Karma Recovery
But since this is karmic, each karma point expended must be balanced out.

* The character reduces the level of success for an important action by one, recovering one point. Multiple points can be recovered by reducing character degree of chance.
* The character gifts an opponent with a karma point, this recovers one point. The GM can opt to "pull points". This can only be done if the character is several points down, or is not recoving or utilizing the negative point.
* The character can "burn off the karma". They spend an impulse (and important post or a full round of actions) not utilizing karma effects. Every impulse after - that they character does not use karma, one negative karma point dissipates.

"But I need the karma point NOW." is a common player whine.  If the character is currently in negative points, but needs to spend a point now, they can do it. The cost is doubled.

Note: In a forum game, the player would simply list their karma at the end of the post... Normally all the mechanics are listed there at the end of the beautiful story post.
Karma -2 (two uses)
Karma +1 (earned back a point)


2.3.3 Resistance
Sometimes actions are opposed by other characters.  The classic oppositions are attacks and defenses and sneaking and spotting.  To succeed against the defending character, the character must achieve one more success than the defending character.  So if the sneaking character makes three Ds while hiding/sneaking, a seeking/searching character must achieve four Ds to find them.  

2.4 Additional Resolution

2.4.1 Attribute DRs
Any action based solely upon innate abilities, utilized one D for species, and one D for every appropriate aspect trait, and three D for any skill trait appropriate to the action. (Should the character have the skill in weight lifting, or strength feats for example)
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"The world needs dreamers to give it a soul."
"And it needs realists to keep it alive."
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StoryPath 3.0 Combat
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2004, 04:15:27 AM »
3.0 Combat/ Tactical
RPGs are often based upon the action/ adventure genres.  There will often be personal combat.  These rules expand upon the basic resolution rules.

Each tactical situation occurs in rounds of action.  Each character should be able to perform one action each round of a tactical situation.  Once everyone has acted (or passed their action), a new round begins.

3.1 Initiative
At the begining of each round, initiative is determined.  Each character's initiative is Initiative: 1D for race, +1D for any combat orriented archetype,
+1D for any aspect related to speed/ dexterity.

In a dice game, each D is rolled.  The successes determine's the character's initiative for that round. If the game is diceless, the character has the same initiative every round, unless they spend Karma.

The play runs down the sequence from the character with the highest initiative to the lowest.  On their count, a character can opt to:
1) take an action
2) declare that they are waiting for something to happen, so then they will act
3) pass, not starting any actions this round.


3.2 Actions
A character in a tactical situation can move and attack, move and defend, attack and defend, or defend and attack, without taking an extra action.  Any extra actions in a round applies a cumlative -1D pentalty for the rest of the round and generates a point of fatigue.

3.2.1 Move
The character can move to somewhere else in the scene, barring obsticles and their own speed.  If they decide to move only a short distance (a few steps) they can make either an attack or a defense action without an extra action.  Note: most movement does not take Ds to do, unless the environment is difficult.

3.2.2 Attack
The character opts to attack another target (usually a character).  Attack is calculated as you would expect:  1D for race, +1D for any combat orriented archetype, +1D for any appropriate combat trait.  To be successful, the attack must generate more success D than any defensive action on the part of the target.  Every extra success beyond what is needed, adds to damage done.  

Note: An attack action is not just a single swing. It is often a combination of feints, thrusts, steps, and attacks.  

3.2.3 Defend
A character can opt to take a defensive action. This could be evasive dodging or parrying incoming attacks.  Defend is calculated as you would expect:  1D for race, +1D for any combat orriented archetype, +1D for any appropriate combat trait for weapon use, +1D for each evasive or defensive trait, +Ds for shields and forcefields.  

If success of attack is greater than defend, apply damage.  

3.2.4 Other Odd actions
A character could opt to do something else that round.  This is perfectly acceptable, as long as the GM agrees what they character is doing is possible durring the round (about 12 seconds, or could be any time).  

3.3 Damage phase

3.3.1 Damage D
The Damage's D is equal to the weapon's D rating, plus one for every extra success the attack was made by.  Melee and Hand to Hand damage is Physically aspected, while Firearms are Dexteritally aspected.

3.3.2 Resistance D
Each target has a resistance D: 1D for race. +1D for a combative orriented Archetype, +1D for any trait that applies to toughness. +1D per level of armor/ shield/ forcefield.

Subtract the Resistance successes or degrees, from any damage.  If there is still damage successes, apply damage to the character.

3.3.3 Ouch- Damage Effects .
Each damage success over the resistance does one point of damage. Each three success of damage, generates a -1D modifer for all actions.
When reaches 0 for actions being used, the character is incapacitated.
Note: the player can opt to be incapacitated at any time.  Incapacitation takes the character out of the adventure for a time, as appropriate.  It can be unconscious, or broken bone, or even dead, as the campaign story dictates.  

3.4 Fatigue
Every time the character exerts itself, by taking an extra action, activating/ maintaing a super power, or fighting in combat for a two rounds, they tire themselves. This is represented by a point of fatigue. Each three points of fatigue generates a -1D modifer for all actions. When reaches 0 for actions being used, the character is incapacitated.

3.5 Small generic list of weapons

0D
Fist/Kick

1D  
Knife  
Club

2D
Rapier
ShortSword
Javalin
Large Club
Derringer

3D
Broadsword
Cutlass
Spear
Mace
Modern 22

4D
Katana
Bastard Sword
Halbard
WarHammer
Colt

5D
GreatSword
Battle Axe
Light Sword

45 Pistol
357 Magnum
Thompson

6D


Armor/ Shields
Bucker  +1D/1D
Round  +2D/+2D
Full       +3D/+2D

1D
Heavy Cloth

2D
Leather
Ballestic Vest

3D
Chainmail
Samurai Armor +1D/3D per shields

4D
Partial Plate

5D
Full Plate
MoonHunter
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"The world needs dreamers to give it a soul."
"And it needs realists to keep it alive."
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Storypath Magic 4.0
« Reply #16 on: May 25, 2004, 06:04:53 AM »
4.0 Power

4.1 Power Traits:
 As defined before, power traits allow character to generate effects beyond what is normally possible for a character. It is used for magic, psionics, clerical capabilities, bardic powers, and a variety of metaphysical activities. Like all general traits, all power traits have two parts: phrase and explanation. The phrase is normally the name of the effect, with a little description of what the effect looks like in the world. Of course the name will imply or suggest what it is.  The explanation is just that, a listing of the trait's game effects.  

Each campaign and setting will have its own guidelines on what is and is not an acceptable power trait.  If the GM does not provide a packet of guidelines, then the player and GM should work out what is acceptable.

Example:
Magic
"Eldritch Bolts":3D of glowing mystic energy -(Power requires incantation and gesture)
"Serriphanic shields": 3D resistance against attacks the target is aware of. -(Power requires incantation and gesture)
"Ariel's hand": Wind based telekensis -(Power requires incantation and gesture)
"Wind's call": Weather manipulation -(Power requires incantation and gesture)
"Scrying": Seeing anywhere the wind goes. This is not just poetic, if the wind touches the area, this spell can see it. (Power)

Psionics
"Empathy":The ability to perceive and change emotions- (Power - No control, will activate on its own.)
"Astreal form": The ability to send an invisible astreal form - (Power, limited to one minute at a time).


4.1.1 Restriction
Each trait must have a limit or restriction. Some of the limits are based upon the special effect of the power or some other tangible limit.  Others are based upon the type of power.  The other type is the most common.

Some common examples are:
Gesture/ Incantation for magic.
Must spend a round or two in prayer for clerical power
Must be holding the staff of power
Power in not completely controlled, sometimes activates on its own.
Patient takes 3 Fatigue points after effect is done.
Patient be sucessfully singing and playing for the effect to occur.


4.2 Power Action:
In the category of "other action", create power effect falls. The Ds for power use are easy to determine, 1D for any magical archetype or power special, 1D for the power trait, and 1D for any trait dealing an appropriate power.  This is NOT something anyone can attempt, so there is no D for species. (Keep in mind that certain species are considered "empowered", so they get the D for species).  If the action defeats the resistance of any counter AND the target's Power Resistance, the effect is generated.  

CatcherofMysticWindfromtheHotWest is a type of elf that is considered magical, and has the mage archetype.  Casting any "spell" that it has one trait for is 3D (one for Mage, one for power trait, one for the magical elf).  He has one aspect trait for metaphysical.  His die roll would be 5+ or he would generate 2Ds per karma point spent.    

4.3 Counter Power
If a character has access to the same type of power, they can try and avoid the effect.  This is the equivalent of a dodge or parry for power actions (though it is an other action, like creating the power effect).  The Ds for the actions is the same as if the character were casting the same effect.  

In an opponent cast an eldritch bolt, CatcherofMysticWindfromtheHotWest could opt to block it, but with only 2D of effect. If someone used Arial's hand (a power trait he has), it would be blocked by 3D.  When a crystromancer casts a charm at Catcher, he can not block it because he does not perform crystromancy.


4.4 Power Resistance
Every "target" has an innate power resistance.  1D for species (if species has soul), 1D for any magical archetype, and 1D for any trait dealing with metaphysical or spiritual strength. Any power effect must overcome this resistance.  

CatcherofMysticWindfromtheHotWest has 3D of power resistance due to his Elven Nature, magical archetype, and metaphysical aspect.

4.5 Manna
Every time the character exerts itself metaphysically (using a power trait, or defending) they tire themselves. This is represented by a point of manna. Each three points of manna generates a -1D modifer for all metaphysical actions.  These modifier for manna is cumlative with fatigue and injury when metaphysical actions are performed.
MoonHunter
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"The road less traveled is less traveled for a reason."
"The world needs dreamers to give it a soul."
"And it needs realists to keep it alive."
Authentic Strolenite ®©

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MegaPowers 5.0
« Reply #17 on: May 26, 2004, 04:28:58 AM »
5.0 Mega-Powers
Certain campaign settings allow characters to have exceptional abilities and powers far beyond what an unassisted character can do.  The super powers of a four colored caped superhero, the cyberware of a cyberpunk character, the exceptional experience of an immortal, exotic equipment of super spys, the programs in the virtual reality system of a 22nd century hacker, or the innate magics of a fantasy guardian, would all be represented by MegaPowers. The GM will normally explain what mega-power and power special effects and themes are possible, as well as provide some example traits.

These Mega-Power traits normally come from a pool of traits, just for this purpose (See Section 1.6).  The number of traits depends on the game. Ten is the common number of super powers or immortal experience, five for cyberware or super spys, and three for fantasy superheroes or psionic games.  


5.1 MegaPower Traits:
MegaPower traits are very much like power traits. They have a phrase and explanation, used in the exact same ways. (The phrase being colorful description and the explanation the game results).  Each one has a flaw or restriction, just like a power trait.  Unlike power traits, no rolls are required to active the power, they just go on.  The only rolls are those used to target the megapower or to use it creatively (flying through obsticals, using a fireattack to weld with...).  Each "activation" costs one fatigue point.  

Each MP trait normally creates 1D of effect per trait, or negate 1D worth of penalty. These Ds are normally in places you don't normally get to add Ds.

Unlike power traits (or any traits) MP traits are "stackable".  Characters can have mutliple copies of the same traits, generating more effect.  So a fast character (like spider guy) might have a trait of superspeed (negating 1D of extra action penalties), A superspeed character might have three traits of super speed and go running around great speeds doing things (Quickguy). A character which specializes in super speed might have five traits (The Blur, KidBlur, Mercury). StoryPath allows you to take the same trait five times.  Some games will have limits as to the number of times a character can take a trait, it is up to the GM.
 
5.1.1 Edges
Now instead of adding Ds and raw effects, the MP trait could add an edge, "a small advantage" different from a raw D.  Some common edges are reduced fatigue (only costs to activate, not to maintain), power does not glow, effects an area, varied special effect/ results, etc.  These edges will very from campaign to campaign as well.  

Some GMs will also allow small disadvantages to be applied to a mega power as well.  Each small flaw will add one trait's worth of effect.

5.2 Mega Trait Explanations, common
Mega Aspects.  The character chooses an aspect like Strength, Dexterity, Intelligence, Will Power, Empathy, Charisma, and so on.  Each Mega Aspect trait adds +1D in any action dealing with that aspect.  In addition, it will allow characters to perform well beyond what people thing of as normal.  This varies by campaign.  For a super hero campaign, one mega-strength allows you to lift and throw a small car (1000 lbs), three might allow you to throw a semi and trailer, five traits will allow you to lift a air craft carrier; while a cyberpunk augmentation might be 200Kg, 500Kgs, and 2000Kgs respectively.  

Mega Attack: 1D of attack, normally ranged. Attacks can be changed to do damaged to the senses  (Flashbangs, bright light) or Entangle targets (creating Ds of Resistance that must be busted out of).

MegaBody: Changes the character's body in some way.  This is normally size, shape, or appearance (including invisability).  

Mega Equipment: One piece of mega equipment is something that a character can not normally have, unless they spend two or more special traits.  This would be things like their own corporation, jet fighters, secret caves of crime fighting goodness, safehouses, weapons of exceptional nature, etc. The general rule is take the normal equipment and take the next step.  Extra traits in MegaEquipment grants even more exceptional capabilities to the equipment.

Mega Experience: Each experience effectively adds a chapter in the characters life.  It gives five traits instead of the normal two.  

Mega Illusion: The effect creates an illusion that fools the senses of the target.  Each D generates 1D of resistance which must be defeated by a perception ability.  Darkness, fog, etc are also possible with illusions.  A very common edge is to "take effects an area".  

Mega Initiative: Adds 1D to the character's initiative.

Mega Mental Powers: These allow the character to function as if they have the power traits of psionics.  Each Trait defines one "power effect" and adds +1D to any activation Ds.  

Mega Move: Everyone normally has 1D in running and swimming.  You can add dice to those, or add movement abilities like flying, gliding, swinging.  

Mega Recovery: Allows a character to recover -1D of trauma almost instantly.  It negates the penalty an impulse or two after the damage is done.  

Mega Resistance: 1D of Resistance. A common edge is Shield Ds (adding to resistance. Reduced Fatigue also very common.

Mega Sense: This enhances the character senses in an exceptional way, with two or three trait mega senses allowing the character to perceive in inhuman ways (radar sense, cosmic awareness, feeling electrical pulses).  

Mega Skills: Character adds +1D to any appropriate skill/ action. In addition, it will allow characters to do things well beyond normal skills.  This is great for simulating "ninja invisability" or "super soldier combat abilities".  Each D can be applied to a Group Skill as well.  

Mega Speed: Mega Speed negates the first D of the multiple action penalty.

5.2.1 MegaPower examples

Luck Powers: MetaAspect Luck, maybe some telekinetic powers.  

Telekinesis: Each Trait allows 1D of strenth to move items.  

Teleportation: A movement ability with the edge, bypasses intervening things.  

X-Ray Vision: Two traits worth of Mega Sense, and adds +2D for appropriate perception.  


5.3 Power Set Examples
PlasmaBlue: This Human appearing Android can burst into blue plasma fire. Can only use Plasma Powers when in flaming form. (10 traits)
1-3) Plasmabolt: 3D ranged attack
4-5) Float on thermal energy: His intense heat lifts him. He can hover and fly at running pace, indefinately (no fatigue for use)
6-8) Plasma Aura I: +2D Resistance as the plasma protects him from incoming attacks (no fatigue for use)
9-10) Plasma Aura II: Flaming Plasma does 1D to anything that touches him. (No fatigue for use)

Fields's Cyberware: All cyberware has the "hardware" restriction, so it can be emped or disabled. (5 trait pool)
1-2) Red Glowing Cyberoptic eye circa 2010: This antique (but so is Fields) has Thermographic and telescopic abilities
3-4) Wired Reflexes: 2D towards speed and dexterity aspects.
5) SkinWeave: Carbon Fibers under the skin grant him greater resistance +2D. It can easily be detected by touch or careful observation.

EbonKnight: A Detective superhero that strikes fear in his victims and the general public. Most of his powers are "items" which can be destroyed or taken away from him. (10 trait pool)

1-2) The Crypt: His secret underground base filled with useful equipment and secret passages to the surface. It is built in a "lost" subway station.
3-4) The DarkRide: This super fast vehicle is filled with tons of offensive and defensive gadgets. While not as fast as the Mach 5, it has more toys.
5-6) Mini-Jet: This mini-jet allows him to patrol from the sky and travel to far away places quickly. It also has stealth abilities.
7-8) Utility Belt: He has gadgets for every occasion. Mostly Smoke and Gas Bombs, a grapple projector, and some tools of the trade.
9) Armored Suit: Provides +3 Resistance -
10) Gauntlets: These add +3 to his hand to hand damage, can have special gimmicks installed in them.
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Offline MoonHunter

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Okay: Really Done
« Reply #18 on: May 29, 2004, 04:37:18 AM »
Okay, before it was a basic outline. Now it is a fairly finished product.  Check it out, then look at the questions below


the Introduction
http://www.strolen.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=20507#20507
   (I find this very weak... it needs work)

and Character Creation Mechanics.  
http://www.strolen.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=20556#20556

and Resolution
http://www.strolen.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=20600#20600

and Combat
http://www.strolen.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=20601#20601

and Magic
http://www.strolen.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=20621#20621

And MegaPowers
http://www.strolen.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=20655#20655
   Though this section needs more examples

Example characters
http://www.strolen.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=20332#20332

Now for the questions...

What do you like about it?
What do you hate about it?
What did not make sense?
What would you use it for?

Note: This game is one that will allow for plug ins, sections of rules to be slapped in for certain games. The plug ins can also just advance the basic rules.  I want to avoid the "creeping elegance" that normally occurs in game design.  This is a barebones system for very fast, very loose play.  If you have things you need, you can always slap a plug in on it.  

What plug ins do you think this game needs right now.
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Offline Iain

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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #19 on: May 29, 2004, 07:14:07 AM »
Basically, I think it's excellent. I thought it sounded like a good system before, and now you have fleshed it out it is even better. I think it has everything it needs - it can cope with almost any scenario.
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Offline CaptainPenguin

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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2004, 08:24:04 PM »
I'd need help to play using it, but hey, that's what GMs are for!
I'm going to try and create a character, so stand by...
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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #21 on: May 31, 2004, 04:18:53 PM »
Thirty-Eight pages, thought it would be easier to print the thread and read it. Yikes!! For a simple system, it sure is difficult, I only read most of the 'finished' portion so far, but there has got to be a way to dumb it down a little. Like a quick reference sheet or something. The general principle is solid but it seems to get bogged in details sometimes. Didn't have a chance to read it all, that is first impressions.

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Offline CaptainPenguin

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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #22 on: May 31, 2004, 04:47:15 PM »
Yeah, that's why I said "try to create a character", not "create a character".
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Offline Shadoweagle

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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #23 on: May 31, 2004, 06:35:57 PM »
*Phew* Finally I got through it all! Took a while :)

I like this a lot. It gives a structure, and yet allows almost as much freedom as imagination.

I do have a bit of a suggestion for a different idea for use of karma:

What about, for an altered view on karma (for veteran players, perhaps) The Karma doesnt give extra SUCCESSES, but if a player rolled a small number on all dice, spending a karma point will allow them to add 1 to a dice roll.

So for example, if they rolled 4D, and got a 6, 5, 4, 1, but they need 3 successes to win, they can spend 1 karma point on the '5' die, and 2 karma points on the '4' die, to give them 6, 6, 6, 1 - 3 successes.

So if they only have 1D for a roll, but they NEED it to win, if they roll a 3, they can add their 3 karma points to that dice to give them a 6.

With this idea, I think that perhaps they can't get karma back by minusing dice numbers, because then they could just minus a 4 or something that already failed. Perhaps spending karma = number on a dice + karma used, and gaining karma = number OF dice - karma.

So in other words, spend your karma wisely, because getting karma back may mean more sacrifice than using karma.

I will also try to make a character soon :)
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Offline Shadoweagle

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StoryPath- an RP system proposal
« Reply #24 on: May 31, 2004, 07:27:04 PM »
Name: Duren Coldhearth
Archetype: Thief
Species: human

1) Chapter: Early Childhood - Harpy raid on homeland.
-- Parents slain. Kidnapped by Harpys.
-- He was raised by the mischevious, moralless creatures in the mountains.

2) Chapter: Young Adult - Human huntings for harpy feathers, attack harpy nestings. His Harpy 'family' is slain. Duren attacks men with dagger to avenge his family, though to no avail. He is captured and taken to civilisation by the hunters.  

Generals:
1) Light-fingered: Character is quick with his hands. (Dexterity aspect)
2) Harpy-claw scars: Shows the beatings he had gotten from the harpy's. Toughness. (Physical aspect)
3) Mischevious and deceptive: Good at making people believe what may not be true. Adept at twisting words (Charisma aspect)
4) Resourceful and  perceptive: Can find solutions to problems, and get out of predicaments with little trouble. (Mental aspect)
5) Only ever hunted with a dagger: Skill with a dagger. Particuarly in the throwing of them.
6) Trade as a street magician: gets any needed money using sleight of hand tricks.
7) "Could take a loaf of bread right out of your hand without you noticing!" : Thievery/stealth skill.
8) "Huh? What man?" : Stealth skill.
9-10) "Did ANYONE see who slit this man's throat!?" : Stealth and dagger usage.
-------------------------------------
11) Survival skills by living with the self-centered harpys.
12) Climbs like a goat: the harpy nests were deep in the mountains
-------------------------------------
13) Slew four armed men with his dagger, before the rest managed to capture him: Dagger skill
14) Took to the city like a duck to water: Urban survival

Flaws:
Mischivious in nature. No attatchments to friends and few morals.
Dislike for humans. Does not cross over to elves/dwarves etc.

Initiative: 2 (Human, #14)
Spot: 2 (Human, #4)
Thievery: 4 (Human, Thief, #6, #7)
Stealth: 5 (Human, Thief, #7, #8, #9)
Survival- wild: 2 (Human, #11)
Survival- urban 3 (Human, Thief, #14)
Attack-Dagger: 5 (Human, Thief, #5, #10, #13)
Defend: 1 (Human)
Defend - Dagger: 5 (Human, Thief, #5, #10, #13)
Resist: 2 (Human, #2)
Lazarus Lightward, Elite Diabolist of the Brotherhood - Level 3 Occultist
Deathpriest Noxx, Herald of Eternal Silence – Level 2 Necromancer
STR: 2 | END: 2 | CON: 4 | DEX: 2 | CHA: 12 | INT: 13


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