Extraneous Voices of Picayune > Tomes and Illusions

What books do you read?

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Strolen:
Just curios what kind of reading you do. I have changing shifts so it takes me longer to fall asleep so I have been devouring books lately. Here is a recent list.

(seeing the Bourne Identity has gotten me into the spy thing. Don't have the books at my library though...bastards)

Day of the Jackal - Fredric Forsyth (awesome)

The Odessa Files - Forsyth

Eagle Has Landed - Jack Higgins (gotta find the movie now)

The Man in the Iron Mask - Alexandre Dumas (liked the movie better...can I say that?)

Tales of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser I, II- Leiber (great fun)

The Black Arrow - Robert Louis Stevenson (written in an old english type dialect sort of. Lots of Y' and ye and odd sentence structure. Get used to it though and makes it fun to read.)

Clockwork Orange - (talk about written in an odd dialect. written in bastardized russion for a lot of the common words. Real hard to get used to. Lucky it is a short book. Wierd!! "O' my brother," "horrorshow," "Yarbles! Great bolshy yarblockos to you. I'll meet you with chain or nozh or britva anytime. I'm not having you aiming tolchocks at me reasonless")

Treasure Island - Stevenson (want to see the movie now)

The Code Book - Simon Singh (pretty cool history of cryptography)

Cryptonomicon - Neal Stephenson (One of my favorites. Lots of technical details about cryptography and the technology. The Tom Clancy of detail in cryptography, makes the book I think)

In Process
Solo - Jack Higgins  (poor refried beans)
Eye of the Storm - Higgins  (ok)
Day of Reckoning - Higgins  (poor compared to the rest)
Fourth Protocol - Forsyth      (Pretty good)

Probably forgetting a couple. I lose track when I get them from the library. Got burned out on fantasy after my vacation over the summer when I read the Assassin Series by Hobb. Excellent series, just had enough. Was time for my reading mood swing so I started on some classics I have never read and let my appetite at the moment guide me for the rest.

Looks like a lot but they are fairly easy reading, and I read fairly quickly. Takes me maybe a total of 4-6 accumulated hours to read a book, and when you can't sleep that accumulates fairly quickly. I have better things to do then read, but I need to try and sleep as well. Wish you could just know when you are going to fall asleep so you can get something accomplished instead of reading for 2 or 3 hours waiting. Not that I mind horribly, but I have homework and webpage coding that I could be doing!!!

What are you up to? Do you have time?

ephemeralstability:
Apart from maths/physics books (yes I'm afraid I read them: algebraic topology, gauge theory, etc.) I am reading Asimov's Foundation and about to start Peake's Gormenghast. I've just finished reading every book ever written by Iain Banks and his sci-fi pseudonym Iain M. Banks. I also recently read Robert Tressell's The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists which is really good especially if you're a socialist. I was also thinking of reading Goethe's Faust but the only copy I have is in German and in that horrendously illegible gothic script.

ephemeralstability!

Ria Hawk:
Lessee, what do I like?  This is just my favorites, not necessarily the ones I've read lately.  Although I've read most recently.
The Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling.  I will own the fifth book whenever they decide to release it.
The Lord of the Rings trilogy, by Tolkein.  And The Hobbit.
The Callahan Cronicles and the Lady Sally and Mary's Place series by Spider Robinson.  Actually, anything by Spider Robinson.  He's my favorite author.
The Chronicles of Chrestomanci by Diana Wynne Jones.  Neat alternate dimenson/magical world setting.
A Swiftly Tilting Planet by Madeline L'Engall.  It's kind of strange, but I don't much care for the other books in the Wrinkle series.
The Black Cauldron by Lloyd Alexander
The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner.  Yay!
The Genesis Code by John Case.  A very disturbing science fiction/conspiracy theory mix.
Assorted ancient history and mythology books.
Books of "Wierd but True Facts"
Books about hauntings, ghosts, and other unexplainable phenomena.
And, of course, the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series by Douglas Adams.  Except for the last one.  I didn't like it much.

I suppose it looks like a lot, but I love to read.  I read more than I watch tv.

ephemeralstability:
I know what you mean about Mostly Harmless, it's a bit weird. I've not read most of the books you mentioned (except the Tolkien obviously), I'll have to look them up sometime. I have to say I'm finding the Histories of Middle Earth quite hard to get into too: too fragmented and bitty. And I keep meaning to read Thief of Time (Terry Pratchett: it's the only Discworld one I've not read yet).

ephemeralstability!

Strolen:
Slept 9 hours in the past two days and have read three books. I am hurting and want to sleep. Insomnia? Whatever it is it sucks. Looking for new books and I will definately check out some of the ones mentioned.

Love Moorcock and the Elric series. Fiest is among my great reads. I have read most of the Wheel of Time by Jordon. Loved them so far but stopped at, I think num 5, will wait till he is done and read the entire series again. For some reason I keep going back to Finn MacCool by Morgan Llywelyn as well. I often like the unpolished darker writing that stories like MacCool and Elric are told in. Unpolished is probably the wrong word, but they stand out from other books in a certain way. Jhereg by Steven Brust is sort of that way. (good book too)

[edit] Ordered The Genesis Code and The Thief. Looks promising. Eph, I have no idea what to do with your suggestions. I think you are way out of my league. You read anything normal? Like 3-little pigs or something? Socialist philosophy and gothic German books are sort of beyond me :P

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