Strolen\s Citadel content. 
The Ring Of Life
Items  (Jewelry)   (Magical)
valadaar's comment on 2013-06-18 09:08 PM
Well, isn't this one interesting. It gets the ideas flowing.

An oldie (10 years!) but a goodie.

Go to Comment
The Ring Of Life
Items  (Jewelry)   (Magical)
dark_dragon's comment on 2007-04-07 08:56 AM
A ring to keep on a cord around your neck when not in use then...(you might even be able to wear it as a bracelet, if it can strech that well)

I like the item, although it might be a bit too potents to let the PCs loose with it. (although you could have so much fun with the challenges it creates!!) Go to Comment
The Ring Of Life
Items  (Jewelry)   (Magical)
Thewizard63's comment on 2008-11-19 10:59 AM
I like the description of the item, and it sparked many thoughts for my campaign.

An additive thought on an alternate creation.
To Create/recharge it, it sucks the life-force from everything within miles, creating dead-zones, with small magically protected circles of life in the center.

This can be especially useful for a necromancer, or any evil villain wishing to start his own empire of abundance by destroying the neighboring empire to feed his. Like an Fantastic A-bomb of death and life. Use it against your enemy's armies. and bolster your crops.

Plot Hook - Zones of death have been appearing through out the countryside like crop circles. Nothing remains alive. Go to Comment
The Ring Of Life
Items  (Jewelry)   (Magical)
Silveressa's comment on 2011-04-26 06:22 AM


This could wreck untold amounts of havoc on desert communities and those not used to a lush and verdant wilderness. A fun artifact to add if you wish to shake up your world a bit and change around the topography unexpectedly,


Go to Comment
The Ring Of Life
Items  (Jewelry)   (Magical)
Nuchiha101's comment on 2010-08-21 12:45 AM
This is a great item with a sensible drawback, Go to Comment
The Ring Of Life
Items  (Jewelry)   (Magical)
Cherry's comment on 2016-06-17 12:17 AM
Ordered description I could follow. I also enjoy that the item is not in a collection to drag it out and pollute your craft.

Since you stated that it could be stretched well beyond expectation, what if it is used around the neck or waist?

An interesting item for any breeder from what I could see. Go to Comment
The Ring Of Life
Items  (Jewelry)   (Magical)
Cherry's comment on 2016-06-17 12:18 AM
An item like this would have drawbacks. Go to Comment
The Ring Of Life
Items  (Jewelry)   (Magical)
Cherry's comment on 2016-06-17 12:19 AM
What if a pasers by NPC wore it as your PC and company is in town? Go to Comment
Time to move on
Plots  (Duty)   (Multi-Storyline)
Barbarian Horde's comment on 2003-11-10 03:12 PM
I like this plot. It is not the typical hack-n-slash. Plus it is the perfect route to start "empire building" for a group of players. The best way for the PCs to ensure that the peasants are never used again so harshly would be to carve out a piece of wilderness for the peasants and then lightly govern it for the peasants benefits. The PCs will then have a strong base of support of wealthy & loyal peasants from which to start building a nation. Just defending their small holdings could keep PCs busy for a long time. Go to Comment
Time to move on
Plots  (Duty)   (Multi-Storyline)
Barbarian Horde's comment on 2003-11-26 05:22 AM
"If you helped the Grazuul Tribe, others require similar help. The reward is bigger, as the risks." "So much gold could only worsen the situation. Someone will come and take it, and all get even more taxed. Unless... unless there come some heroes to help!"

If the PC's did help the Grazuul, maby the scorn they get for helping lowly orcs is just what the townsfolk here are looking for . . . proof of heroes with some true measure of character. The townsfolk had the money all along but were afraid of hiring mecenaries because the mercenaries might well just make off with the loot instead of helping them move away from an abusive ruler. They want to hire the PCs when their reputation finds its way to their town, but the messenger sent to hire the PC's (Jonas) is attacked and dies at he PC's feet before he gets his message across.
Its up to the PC's to uncover the mystery of the man that died at their feet and make their way to his village. His personal effect can give clues. Perhaps they can have the chance to track and capture the man that killed Johnas, interogating him for information.
Since the gold in the well is to purchase lands for their own independence, and the villagers feel they can trust the heroes, they have the motivation for a non-standard reward. The non-standard reward could be:

1) Town Craftsmen offer to make them special weapons or armor, give them horses and cattle, anything but the actual gold they need for themselves.

2) They offer the PC's marriage to some of the towns-maidens. In feudal cultures arrianged marriages were not uncommon. What a nice coincidence that their are some particlarly well suited virgins come of age just now. Beside a marriage to a capable, heroic, healthy PC is a greater honor than any of them could normaly hope for. This is especially true if some PC's have titles from their background or other adventures. If you like this option but the PCs don't, subterfuge can go along way-- towns folk who get the PC's druged or intocicated and married in a quick ceremony. For those honorable character they now have a dilema, especially if they can't remember what happened on their "wedding night". If a PC's is looking for a follower this is a way to give them more than they bargained for when their new bride shows interest and aptitide in adverture. As a follower she could have skills as a savy thief, studied magician, or trained in the sword by a father concerned for her virtue (irony is wonderful). All kinds of possible twists here.

3)The townsfolk might trust the PC's enough to aks them to be their new rulers and defenders. The PC's as a group would be a council based multi-person government. The townsfolk offer this reward when the heroes prove themselves in the Exodus instead other rewarde previously offered. great for PC desireing a kindom as mentioned before.

-D. Robinson david@jaredrobinson.com Go to Comment
Time to move on
Plots  (Duty)   (Multi-Storyline)
Barbarian Horde's comment on 2005-05-10 12:31 PM
i would like to know how a peasant becomes a freeman for i have been doing this topic ay school and i would be more than happy to find out how Go to Comment
Time to move on
Plots  (Duty)   (Multi-Storyline)
Strolen's comment on 2003-01-29 03:27 AM
Actually, peasants were a general catagorization that included freeman and villeins. The villeins were basically the serfs.

Serfs owed servitude to the Lord for the use of the land and were also under the sole jurisdiction of the Lord. When you look at freemen, pretty much the same could be said of them. They still owed the Lord labor or rent but it was much less and they were exempt of many other taxes.

Point of it all is that anybody could leave the Lord, freeman or villein (serf). It is a matter of money. A "chevage" was paid to the Lord by the serf for the ability to live 'off' the estate. It was suppose to be yearly and then they could do as they wished. Freemen could just leave.

When it comes down to it, the idea of a tax collector is the most out of place. Payments were almost always made in labor and only the wealthy peasants were able to pay their way out of the physical labor with money. You owe so much for the land you use: work to pay it off -or- pay cash the equal of the work owed for it. The Lords counted on a lot of work and if most of the peasants paid instead of worked, they would have to hire them to do the work anyway. If there was a tax collector it was often times a respected person of the village that was given the responsibility by the Lord and only had limited power.

But then again this is a fantasy so anything is possible :-) Go to Comment
Time to move on
Plots  (Duty)   (Multi-Storyline)
manfred's comment on 2003-01-30 05:37 AM
Taxes can come in various guises. Part of the reason the collector is so greedy, is he only collects food or wool or whatever they produce, never gets actual cash. If a lords lands are particularly large, not all peasants have to work, but all pay taxes in some way.

An uncaring lord may well give that responsibility to someone the village not trusts.

And if you don't like it, replace him with anyone else. Greed is not limited to tax collectors... ;-) Go to Comment
Time to move on
Plots  (Duty)   (Multi-Storyline)
manfred's comment on 2003-11-26 06:02 AM
Wow. Motives and many possibilities to explore.

Thank you for this comment. I will contemplate on this more. Go to Comment
Time to move on
Plots  (Duty)   (Multi-Storyline)
manfred's comment on 2005-05-11 06:06 AM
From http://sinclair.quarterman.org/glossary/glossary.html

A freeman is not a noble and not a serf. A freeman was usually a tradesman or craftsman such as a fisherman, bargeman, fishmonger, leather worker, miller, or the like. A serf could become a freeman by serving as an apprentice to a freeman; by buying his freedom, or by being the son of a freeman.

There can be easily other conditions, such as serving in the army for some time, being the tenth child of a serf, being granted freeman status after some exceptional deed, and so on. Google for more data on history pages. Go to Comment
Time to move on
Plots  (Duty)   (Multi-Storyline)
Agar's comment on 2003-01-28 12:47 PM
The characters are starting to become well known as champions of the weak. Well, as long as there is something in it for them.

The amount of money would have to be a delicate balance. Enough to buy land, but not enough to make the lord jealous. It's very diffcult to have a sum like that unless the degrees of wealth between the poor and the rich are vastly different. Like the cost of the lord's breakfast could buy one of the peasant's homes.

Depending on how greedy and/or evil the tax collector is, he might serve as a well timed complication to the exodus by having a small troop of guards show up with him at the village, bent on finding the other 3 or 4 golds he expects. Claim the villagers were trafficking with spys or traitors or such. Were would a serf get such wealth after all? Go to Comment
Time to move on
Plots  (Duty)   (Multi-Storyline)
CaptainPenguin's comment on 2003-01-28 04:59 PM
Actually, in feudalism, serfs couldn't leave. They wer considered a piece of the land. However, peasants were allowed but what was the point? Go to Comment
Time to move on
Plots  (Duty)   (Multi-Storyline)
CaptainPenguin's comment on 2005-05-10 09:05 PM
Uh, well...
I dunno'. We aren't a medieval studies site, we're roleplaying. Look elsewhere, kid. Go to Comment
Time to move on
Plots  (Duty)   (Multi-Storyline)
valadaar's comment on 2011-06-28 11:25 AM


Plot idea and history lesson in one. Nice one Manfred.



 


Go to Comment
Helping the Grazuul Tribe
Plots  (Discovery)   (Single-Storyline)
Barbarian Horde's comment on 2003-11-10 03:16 PM
I like this one also because it untypical and unepic. It is also grounds to start "empire building". After all the orcs will need protector and the PCs could use the rest of the unclaimed land as a new nation for themselves Go to Comment
Total Comments:
3233

Join Now!!



Wet Faeries

       By: Murometz

Sages and naturalists frown at the common name given to these strange creatures by the small folk, but sometimes the silliest nicknames for creatures, places and people persevere in the minds of many. “Purifiers”, “Pond Jellies”, “Breath-Stealers”, “Lung-Ticklers” and “River Butterflies” are much less commonly heard appellations for these life forms. Wet Faeries are basically (and simply) a species of fist-sized, fresh-water jellyfish. Several traits steer them toward the peculiar category however. Firstly, Wet Faeries are nearly invisible in the water, much like their marine cousins but even more so. One can swim in a river swarming with these critters and not even notice their presence. Secondly, they possess the unique ability to clean and purify whatever body of water they inhabit. They do this via some sort of biological filtration process, sucking in all toxins present in the water, and releasing it back in its purest form. Needless to say, they are both a blessing and a curse to whichever folk dwell beside the rivers and lakes Wet Faeries inhabit. On one hand, no purer water can be found anywhere than a Wet Faerie lake or pond, and yet, in “pure” water “life” tends in fact to die out, lacking the needed nutrients to prosper. Thirdly, their “sting” is (unfortunately) virulently poisonous to all mammalians. Wet Faeries are loathe to sting anyone or anything, using their barbed fronds as a last line of defense, but if stung, most swimmers will suffer respiratory arrest, and die within minutes, usually drowning before they can make it back to shore.

Alchemists, druids, and less savory characters have studied these creatures over the years, and have predictably found all the ways Wet Faeries could be exploited. Morbidly humorous, some bards find it, that the Poisoners and Assassins Guilds as well as the Healer’s Union, all prize these creatures. The assassins use the extracted venom in obvious fashion, while the priests and healers use the still-living jelly-fish to sterilize other poison potions and to cure those already poisoned on death’s door.

It is known that a certain Earl Von Trumble keeps his vast castle moat stocked with Wet Faeries, the waters so clear that every bone of every one of his past enemies can be clearly seen on the bottom, twenty two feet below.

Encounter  ( Any ) | June 20, 2014 | View | UpVote 6xp