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Teaching the Rules
Articles  (Rules and Advice)   (Game Mastering)
Kassil's comment on 2005-12-14 10:14 AM
Personally, my method to handling it is generally to work the new player through a sample combat or two. That pretty much takes care of all the die rolling right there...

However, I can see how this method would work rather well. Go to Comment
Teaching the Rules
Articles  (Rules and Advice)   (Game Mastering)
nitouken's comment on 2005-12-14 10:14 AM
Although I rarely have the time or opportunity, my favored method of teaching the rules is somewhat like that. I discuss the character in depth, go through a few free-form roleplaying encounters, and then begin working on a character, from the ground up. Granted, it does involve learning a pile of rules that the player may not understand at first, but as the character develops, the player will begin to understand. The easiest way of teaching someone the rules is to create a character, however, because as they write down all those little numbers, they will gradually begin to see their interconnectivity. Go to Comment
Teaching the Rules
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Akihikio's comment on 2005-12-14 10:13 AM
You have no idea how badly I needed this topic.

I've got two people who have never played, never seen it played, and really really want to.

I'm going to use this idea. Although I may tweek it a little... Go to Comment
Teaching the Rules
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Mourngrymn's comment on 2005-12-14 10:56 AM
This is a great idea. I actually started a campaign around using a school as the center piece. This is also a good way to teach others who to play the game, which in my case I had to take experienced gamers and teach them a new game, which went fairly easy.

Just like you said I used each class, scenario, to teach a new aspect of the rules, combat, magic, skill usage, etc. This seems ot work real well. Go to Comment
Teaching the Rules
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Chaosmark's comment on 2007-01-25 07:47 PM
Interesting. I'm glad this sub popped up under the random list, as it can help all of us to some degree or another. Go to Comment
Teaching the Rules
Articles  (Rules and Advice)   (Game Mastering)
KendraHeart's comment on 2005-12-14 11:53 PM
This works only in the starting of a campaign. And only with novices.

Sure you could teach the players a bit about the setting and its culture, but mostly it would be wasted upon them. However, such a training situation does let them "level up" some before they go out and adventure. Go to Comment
Teaching the Rules
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KendraHeart's comment on 2005-12-14 11:53 PM
Forgot to vote Go to Comment
Authentic LARP 1: Cavern Systems
Articles  (Other Gaming)   (Game Mastering)
KendraHeart's comment on 2005-12-14 11:59 PM
This larp would be more visceral than most I have played in, but it is an intersting idea. Go to Comment
Authentic LARP 1: Cavern Systems
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valadaar's comment on 2013-05-14 09:40 AM
It has been a long, long time since I last Larp'd but this would be quite fun! Go to Comment
Authentic LARP 1: Cavern Systems
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Dossta's comment on 2011-12-22 03:06 PM


I have never LARPed, personally, but the ideas presented here are very compelling.  They could be easily adapted to other situations, such as running a haunted house during Halloween, and some of the ideas (the sounds and smells, especially) can be easily incorporated into tabletop sessions.  Thanks for the ideas.


Go to Comment
Music during a game
Articles  (At Table)   (Game Mastering)
Barbarian Horde's comment on 2006-03-19 07:43 AM
The Emerald Rose song is called, "The Castle of Arianrhod". Arianrhod was a goddess of teaching and initiation. Go to Comment
Music during a game
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Strolen's comment on 2005-12-08 10:13 AM
Most of the music we listened to (when we did, which wasn't as often as we should of) was the Sound of Nature series. The best one that I remember was the one that was the recordings of the sounds that a whale makes. Call it silly, but that is an eerie sound. Have it just loud enough to hear and when the shrill cry of the whale sounds it is just enough to make you look around.

The Conan soundtracks are a somewhat obvious one. Just a good old fantasy sounding romp with plenty of bass and drums to get the blood flowing.

You can tell I am not too deep into the classical. Although I think the favorite that I own is Beethoven Symphony Number 9 Choral. I like that one mucho. Been looking for others but never know what to buy...now I have a shopping list. Go to Comment
Music during a game
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Strolen's comment on 2005-12-08 10:14 AM
I actually didn't really like the soundtrack for LOTR. The only song I liked was the first one for the hobbits. Had a nice little melody.

I listen to this type of music all the time. I love the music in a lot of movies and use them for background for coding, studying etc. Depending on my mood of course. I don't know enough classical (now I do a little thanks to eph) to be able to choose it. Beethoven's 6th is the only one I know I like...anyway.

Soundtracks I listen to (a few are in my CD changer as we speak):
Braveheart (no explanation needed)

Gladiator (haunting melodies. I love the main theme and there is that one part that maintains the theme throughout most of it that I love hearing)

Conan - any movie (downloaded from the net. love the drums and evil sounding stuff)

Diablo video game (sounds sort of silly, but I love some of the tracks)

Robin Hood (except I hate the mood break when Bryan Adams actually sings at the end of the CD. What a downer)

Matrix (oops, how did that get in there. Love this for good hardcore coding. Gets my fingers going and keeps me motivated. Hey, I can pretend. Maybe one day I will fall asleep and wake up to "Wake up Strolen" on my computer screen. You don't know it won't happen.)

Anybody know of some good drum banging oriental type music. I love the stuff at the begining of Rising Sun. Have no idea how to go about finding that type of music. Go to Comment
Music during a game
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ephemeralstability's comment on 2005-12-08 10:13 AM
Whalesong is a great noise. I hadn't thought of using for an adventure, but it's so eldritch it's bound to send shivers up your spine in the silences between combats. It was actually incorporated into a piece of symphonic music by Alan Hovhaness (called "And God Created Great Whales"). Go to Comment
Music during a game
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ephemeralstability's comment on 2005-12-08 10:16 AM
Shostakovitch, Symphony No. 4 **** ## ## ##

We've just started playing* this piece in an orchestra and it's amazing. Shostakovitch withdrew it before it was ever performed because it would have been perceived by the Stalinists as being anti-regime and it wasn't performed for another 25 years. It could be used primarily for battles/combats/to indicate great suffering and anguish, or any other common roleplaying scene. Especially the fast fugal section in the 1st movement.

*When I say "playing" I mean "trying unsuccessfully to play" on my part anyway.

WARNING: Do not attempt to listen to this piece of music if you are of a nervous disposition. Do not attempt to listen to it if you don't like modern music. Do not attempt to listen to it if you have delicate ear-drums. Go to Comment
Music during a game
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ephemeralstability's comment on 2005-12-08 10:17 AM
Monkish chants! Definitely. Very atmospheric. The Tallis Scholars do lots of good monky stuff too (or should I say monky business?).

Also Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite was a major omission from the list! Hall of the Mountain King is great! Go to Comment
Music during a game
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ephemeralstability's comment on 2005-12-08 10:24 AM
Mahler definitely! And I've been listening to Dvorak's Vodnik (Water Goblin) which is also very good for fantasy music. Also try Stravinsky's Chant du Rossignol, based on one of Hans Christian Andersen's stories about a nightingale. It's very weird, but atmospheric. Go to Comment
Music during a game
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ephemeralstability's comment on 2005-12-08 10:25 AM
I wholeheartedly agree! Despite the fact that I actually started this thread I often don't use music during games, because it can be too much of a distraction. I like the idea of designating a player to run the music, because it takes the stress away from us DMs! Go to Comment
Music during a game
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ephemeralstability's comment on 2005-12-08 10:32 AM
You could always try Nimrod by Elgar or Holst's Jupiter. Many people find these pieces patriotic and noble, I just think they're good pieces of music. Go to Comment
Music during a game
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manfred's comment on 2005-12-08 10:12 AM
My especial recommendations are the Rach' Symphonic Dances, Prokofiev Symphony 3 and Stravinsky's Firebird.

Dvorak: Legends: (No. 3) Elvish dance.***

Dvorak: Symphony 7: (1st mvmt) Dramatic introduction to adventure.****

Dvorak: Symphony 9 From the New World: This is so good it can be used for anything.*****

Khachaturian: Spartacus:(Suite No 2: Entrance of the Merchants) This is just Khachaturian being Khachaturian.*
(Suite No 2: Dance of the Pirates) Exactly what it says it is.****
(Suite No 3: Dance of a Greek Slave) Fast, furious combat music.**

Liszt: Totentanz: Anything demonic and death-related.*** ##

Mahler: Symphony 1: (1st mvmt) For all Star-Trek roleplayers: TNG must have ripped off the first minute of this symphony.*

Mahler: Symphony 5: (1st mvmt) Funeral march doesn't begin to sum it up. Mahler's music is so varied and contrasting that if you're looking for a particular atmospheric effect it'll be in one of his symphonies.***

Mendelssohn: Hebrides Overture (Fingal's Cave): Vast sea-cave filled with crashing waves, the home of the giant Fingal.*****

Mussorgsky: Night on a Bare Mountain: The best known musical portrayal of a Witches' Sabbath aside from Berlioz's Symphony Fantastique.

Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition: (Bydlo) Slave camp or march of orcish warriors,****
(Catacombae, Con mortuis in lingua mortua) Candlelit, silent dungeon,***
(The Hut on Fowl's Legs) The appearance of any large monster.*****
(The Great Gate at Kiev) Heroic ending to an adventure.*****

Orff: Carmina Burana: Anything satanic (it's actually an ominous-sounding choral setting of some rude latin poems).****

Prokofiev: Piano Concerto 2: (2nd mvmt) Anything manic.**** ##
(3rd mvmt) Oppressive regime or prison camp.**** ##
(4th mvmt) Anything manic.***!!! ##

Prokofiev: Piano Concerto 5: (2nd mvmt) March of the ungainly gnolls.*** ##
(3rd mvmt) Anything manic.*** ##
(5th mvmt) Revenge of the leprechaun legions.****

Prokofiev: Romeo and Juliet: (Dance of the Knights) The best known part of the piece. Suitable for combat scenes. ***** ##
(Tybalt meets Mercutio & they fight) Any combat scene.***
Other extracts could be used for any purpose (it's a very wide-ranging piece).

Prokofiev: Symphony 3: (1st mvmt) The Abyss - you'll see what I mean. Just when you thought this was the man who wrote Peter & the Wolf, you find out he wrote this.***
(2nd mvmt) Mourning a dead PC.****
(3rd mvmt) Chase/combat music.****
(4th mvmt) The Abyss, generally evil combat music (even more so than the beginning of the 1st movement).***** ## ##

Rachmaninoff: Isle of the Dead: Atmospheric forest or sea at night.*****

Rachmaninoff: Symphonic Dances: (1st) Conjures up images of rangers riding through dark forests away from the clouds of blackness.*****
(2) Weird evil woodfolk dancing in the dells and waterfalls,****
(3) Generally eldritch and Dungeon and Dragonsy.****

Rachmaninoff: Caprice Bohemien: Ominous fantasy on folk themes. Good backing for a poverty-stricken peasant-village or for adding weight to a prophesy or explication of a scenario. Dramatic introduction to an adventure.****

Rachmaninoff: Etudes Tableaux (No. 6): Fiendish, tense chase music.****

Rimsky-Korsakov: Le coq d'or (Suite): (King Dodon on the Battlefield) The assembly of a goblin army.***

Rimsky-Korsakov: Mlada (Suite): (Lithuanian Dance): Medieval cavalry assemble in dark, misty torchlight.***
(Cortege): Medieval victory parade.***

Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherezade: Ocean voyages and general adventure soundtrack.*****

Saint-Saens: Danse macabre: Anything demonic or eldritch.****

Sibelius: Symphony 5: (3rd mvmt) Rousing nostalgic finale to a good campaign.*****

Stravinsky: Firebird: (The firebird and his dance) Entrance of roc or strange flying creature - this lasts about 18 seconds.****
(King Kastchei's Infernal Dance) Any combat or demonic event.***** ##

Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring: Extracts could be used for almost any purpose.**** ##

Tchaikovsky: Symphony 1 (Winter Reveries): A village in the middle of winter, surrounded by wolves and ice.*****

Tchaikovsky: Manfred Symphony: I had to put this one in, just for manfred It's also a good piece of music. The second movement is an evil fairy dance a bit like the Rach' Symphonic Dances.***

Tchaikovsky: Romeo and Juliet: Extracts suitable for almost any purpose.*** Go to Comment
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