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Green Sleeves
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valadaar's comment on 2012-12-11 09:48 PM
A great concept. It could work! Go to Comment
Green Sleeves
Items  (SpaceShips)   (Non-Magical)
valadaar's comment on 2012-12-12 07:35 AM
To expand on this, people are considering building habitable spaces using essentially balloons.

Vacuum only 'sucks' because the air-pressure we (and plants) need is quite high, exerting about 15 PSI. Apparently, plants may be able to survive lower pressures then us, so 15PSI may be excessive.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/ast.2009.0362 Go to Comment
Green Sleeves
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Silveressa's comment on 2012-02-18 05:45 AM


This one deserves the full sub treatment, there's too much potential to cover in a mere 100 words when it comes to something so complex.



As a inspiration for a quick window dressing in a scifi setting it's good to go, but I would dearly love to see more of this, it's the start of something special.

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Green Sleeves
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montreve's comment on 2012-02-13 03:29 PM


This is a cool idea. Strangely I think this was too long...



The idea of the 100 word post (as I understand it) is to give the skeleton, and let others flesh it out in their mind, or in their setting.



Great idea, I just think it could be better refined into a 100 words or better expanded into a longer post.



Also, I think you meant that instead of the in the first line.

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Green Sleeves
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OmegaDraco's comment on 2012-02-14 10:57 AM


Clever concept. I was thinking that these could be used to grow crops in the vacuum of space. Basically infinite farmland. But it looks like you're shooting at a source of O2 and sugar (and possibly energy). That's actually a really cool idea, but why can't we have both? Green Sleeves seem more than capable vessles to accomplish food, oxygen, and energy.


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Green Sleeves
Items  (SpaceShips)   (Non-Magical)
caesar193's comment on 2012-12-11 02:02 PM
I just have one question. How do space ships dock with a bunch of Sleeves hanging around the station? Go to Comment
Green Sleeves
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RHHale's comment on 2012-12-10 02:01 PM
Neat idea, but I can't have complete suspension of disbelief here. Not gonna work in a vacuum:( But cool idea. Go to Comment
Green Sleeves
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RHHale's comment on 2012-12-11 06:41 PM
Well for one reason there isn't any Co2 in space to allow the plant to grow...and besides water is also a resource plants need and there isn't any in space either...and if there was, it would be frozen and the plant would also freeze and stop or kill the growth process.... space is about 3 kelvin. Go to Comment
Green Sleeves
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RHHale's comment on 2012-12-11 06:45 PM
...and radiation...and depressurization... all the gases that are int he plant would disperse and blow the plant to pieces...this would happen almost immediately. But in a fantasy world they could probably exist:) Go to Comment
Green Sleeves
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RHHale's comment on 2012-12-11 08:12 PM
yeah that's cool... from what I read your "leaves" float about in space and they are used as a source for docking and living organisms to replenish? All that being said plants can not renew them sleves as we know them they need an atmosphere Go to Comment
Green Sleeves
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RHHale's comment on 2012-12-11 08:32 PM
I think I get it now as I re-read it a few times and looked between the lines. The nets are a sort of sack that holds the phytoplankton or algae and the umbilical cord is sort of a symbiotic connection to the stations. The cords allow passage of nutrients from each body? Like I said cool idea, just might not be able to suspend complete disbelief...cheers:) Go to Comment
Bucky Batteries
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Scrasamax's comment on 2012-02-01 11:17 PM


I can think of a great number of uses for something like this, the first that comes to mind is as the power source for navigational beacons and bouys around star systems and and for interstellar travel. The power requirement to just run a basic ping is pretty low, and if it has a few capacitors it can charge up and release fairly 'loud' navigational pings. Some other ideas include powering scientific observation satellites, the sort of thing a starship would zip up and kick out and move on, while scientists elsewhere receive and decipher the data. Good thing for long term observations, or for providing satellites to frontier level worlds and colonies. It doesn't carry a lot of data, but a satellite with a bucky core could serve as the seed of global communications.


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Bucky Batteries
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Cheka Man's comment on 2012-06-08 10:09 AM
Nice and useful. Go to Comment
Bucky Batteries
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Chaosmark's comment on 2012-03-02 01:07 PM
Only voted Go to Comment
Bucky Batteries
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Roack's comment on 2012-02-10 05:18 PM


You've managed to make the battery novel, not an easy task.



I could see them used as an auxilliary battery in starships, something equivalent to having a second battery in your car to power just the lights. Although, in the case of spacefaring, it would be better served as life support. The incredibly long lifespan would mean that even used-spaceship buyers wouldn't have to worry about replacing them.


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Bucky Batteries
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axlerowes's comment on 2012-06-11 12:22 PM
Your comment exceed 100 words, which was the limit for this item.

"The biggest problem is: why would you ever use a bucky battery instead of solar panels? Space is full of free energy. Hell, starlight can even push your ship. "

Perhaps on a dedicated spaceship you wouldn't. As with wattage you would need capacitors and other hardware to make use of the core. Can you harness starlight if you are moving faster than light?

"But the other problem is wattage. Atomic batteries trickle out their energy over very long times. The way we use it now (space, deep-sea, pacemakers) it is just to monitor a low-energy sensor, and then activate a lithium battery or something that actually sends out a signal, activates an alarm, etc."

Okay, so this is a good use for atomic batteries.

"The half-life is a problem, too. If you double the half-life, you cut the wattage in half. Out of all the possible isotope/buckyball configurations, why would we design a battery that lasts thousands of years (which we probably don't need) at the expense of effective power (which we do)?"

The half-life isn't the problem as I see it, the half-life was the point, because
-Space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind- bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.-

I wanted to create something man made that could transcend the a historic time scale, be a note on a geological time scale and a blip on the galactic time scale. How long will space exploration take? How does time work when things move faster then light. Some old sci-troupes may have a man traveling for 10,000 years but only aging 10 years. Will he want to be able to turn on the lights when he gets home? The time scale that you suggest (we need) is story specific. I know that many readers and sci-fi fans find long-time scales difficult to accept. I read that focus groups found Aragon's in the Lord of the Rings off putting.

What time scale for a sci-fi narrative do you think people are willing accept for a story about humanity? 100 years in the future, 10,000 years in the future, 100,000 years in the future? I am have always found the out of time or over lapping time line stories to be very interesting and compelling.

Also, is technology always going to give us the best and most efficient answer to problems?

"Kw/Day" You think giving the joules released per gram per second or coulombs per kilo would make this more accessible?
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Bucky Batteries
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axlerowes's comment on 2014-04-17 07:15 PM
Nobody else called that out! The real piece of B.S. sci-fi hand waving in this is not the radioactive power source but the mechanism of extending atomic half lives. Go to Comment
Bucky Batteries
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axlerowes's comment on 2014-04-17 10:09 PM
That was another unexplored conceit in here, the hardware that converts the radiation to usable energy/electricity is not clearly defined. I imagine that would be something similar to solar panels directed at receiving the radiation. But perhaps we could imagine some sort of particle sink that could collect gamma rays, increase the energy state of a nuclear particle (as opposed to increase the energy status of electron orbits) , then release the energy again before returning to a lower energy receptor status. Go to Comment
Bucky Batteries
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valadaar's comment on 2014-04-17 11:08 AM
Okay, so the big difference between these and real world RTGs is that RTGs use far shorter half-lifed materials, and so the energy/kg of fuel is much more dilute over time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioisotope_thermoelectric_generator

A neat idea.
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Bucky Batteries
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valadaar's comment on 2014-04-17 09:19 PM
I"m fascinated by RTGs, and wish there was a decent way to capture gamma/xrays to generate power with any degree of efficiency. RTGs are a little better than steam engines, using a thermal-couple, but capturing heat seems so primitive.

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