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Megan Sharwan
NPCs  (Extras)   (Knowledge/Lore)
Silveressa's comment on 2014-04-09 01:21 AM
Update: Fixed the formatting, so hopefully it's easier to read and more pleasing to the eye. Go to Comment
Megan Sharwan
NPCs  (Extras)   (Knowledge/Lore)
Silveressa's comment on 2014-04-08 05:23 PM
Aye, this one got messed up from editing, or during a sit update, I'll give it an overhaul and fix the errors in the next day or so, thanks for bringing them to my attention. Go to Comment
Megan Sharwan
NPCs  (Extras)   (Knowledge/Lore)
Kassy's comment on 2014-06-24 11:29 AM
A pretty solid char. Definitely a world I'd like to learn more about. I'll have to see about getting myself a copy of the core rules for Shadowrun. Go to Comment
Megan Sharwan
NPCs  (Extras)   (Knowledge/Lore)
Dossta's comment on 2010-12-23 12:25 PM


I like her.  Like Siren said, she's pretty standard fare, but the back-story was a well-written and enjoyable read.  The main issue I have with this piece is probably inherent in the setting, but . . . how can a pair of elves produce a human child?  That really messes with my suspension of disbelief.  Was she really switched at birth?  Adopted, but her parents didn't want to admit it later?  Some explanation there would be helpful.


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Megan Sharwan
NPCs  (Extras)   (Knowledge/Lore)
Dossta's comment on 2010-12-23 01:11 PM
Ah, now I see. Those two lines helped a lot, so thanks for the update. Go to Comment
The Majestic Silver Oak
Lifeforms  (Flora)   (City/ Ruin)
Strolen's comment on 2010-12-25 01:47 PM


Nice tree/town legend. I especially like the hook that if the emperor finds out about the tree and the history that he will do what he can to destroy it. Has great plot hook written all over it! Not sure that it will help his image though.


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The Majestic Silver Oak
Lifeforms  (Flora)   (City/ Ruin)
Cheka Man's comment on 2010-12-23 07:56 AM
Only voted Go to Comment
The Majestic Silver Oak
Lifeforms  (Flora)   (City/ Ruin)
Murometz's comment on 2010-12-22 10:47 PM


Purty. Well described and i have to second Dossta on the girl who died w/o wishing for revenge idea being a refreshing one.

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The Majestic Silver Oak
Lifeforms  (Flora)   (City/ Ruin)
valadaar's comment on 2014-01-10 11:37 AM
A simple, horrific and sadly believable tale. I agree with Strolen on the imperial hook. This too is sad and believable.

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The Majestic Silver Oak
Lifeforms  (Flora)   (City/ Ruin)
Silveressa's comment on 2010-12-22 03:39 PM


I'm glad you like it, feel free to use the entire town built around it as well. http://strolen.com/viewing/Silver_Oak


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The Majestic Silver Oak
Lifeforms  (Flora)   (City/ Ruin)
Silveressa's comment on 2010-12-23 11:42 PM
Anytime, if you could, please send me a pm about the changes and how it works out in your campaign, I'm curious how well your players like it. Go to Comment
The Majestic Silver Oak
Lifeforms  (Flora)   (City/ Ruin)
Kassy's comment on 2012-04-22 06:24 PM


Tragic.



Choosing her music above vengeance is also a nice addition.



Inspirational too, thank you Silveressa!


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The Majestic Silver Oak
Lifeforms  (Flora)   (City/ Ruin)
Moonlake's comment on 2010-12-22 07:08 PM


Overall, a solid piece. Like Dossta,  I like the tragic yet positive ending to the bard's story that gives rise to the tree.

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The Majestic Silver Oak
Lifeforms  (Flora)   (City/ Ruin)
Dossta's comment on 2010-12-22 03:18 PM


Beautiful tree with evocative imagery.  I will definitely rip this out and put it into my own world, one day.  I like that the girl died *without* wishing for revenge -- how novel!


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The Majestic Silver Oak
Lifeforms  (Flora)   (City/ Ruin)
Ramhir's comment on 2010-12-23 07:43 PM


I'm using this, and the town of Silver Oak, with some modifications, in my campaign. Thanks, Silv!


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The Star Hammer
Items  (Ranged Weapons)   (Campaign Defining)
manfred's comment on 2008-12-25 02:13 PM
Where is that Siren guy when we need him? I like this delicious evil thinking on such a cosmic scale, but there are two questions that need answering:

- how much iron is needed again? I find it hard to believe, that a random asteroid out of its orbit couldn't deliver the same dose of iron or more. Suns should be dieing left and right. Or is it in the method of delivery, that it has to reach the core of a star?

- how long does it really take? I would rather imagine it works in geological timescales... giving the fuse a duration of millions of years. Go to Comment
The Star Hammer
Items  (Ranged Weapons)   (Campaign Defining)
manfred's comment on 2008-12-27 07:49 AM
Thanks to Siren and Kassil.

Now, of course throwing lots of iron may be more effective when applied on a planet. But there may be other reasons. Maybe the attackers wish to make a truly lasting impression, destroying a whole solar system instead of just a planet. Or the planet is too well protected, but its beleaguered inhabitants don't protect the sun. Even if whole planets are hurtled into the star, this is still a fairly crude method of attacking, so it could be used against a more advanced civilization by a primitive race that doesn't mind the expense. So it is usable. Go to Comment
The Star Hammer
Items  (Ranged Weapons)   (Campaign Defining)
Kassil's comment on 2008-12-25 08:26 PM
While the basic logic is sound - a sufficient mass of iron or higher elements will, indeed, cause the star to choke and die - the particulars are, as Siren pointed out far more effectively than I, a bit light. Considering the sheer size and mass of the stellar core of our own sun, 'several tons' will be about as effective in impacting the sun as a few nanograms of dust might be on us, if that much.

Essentially, it's a novel idea, but if I were to have enough mass available to me to have an effect on these multi-million-degree titan of a thermonuclear reactor that is a stellar core, I'd rather shear off pieces to use as relativistic kinetic weapons, if I needed to kill something. It's less prone to showering the local stellar region with murderous amounts of radiation, for one thing, and ELEs are just as good at convincing species to roll over and die.

White dwarf stars - the end point of our sun - consist of an earth-sized-or-larger lump of iron. The stars tend to survive through the accumulation of this mass until they run out of fuel in the fusion reaction. They also go through a process of accumulating multiple layers of 'ash' - helium being the first stage of such - that require greater pressures and temperatures than hydrogen does in order to undergo fusion. During this whole process, flukes of pressure and temperature will result in relatively trace amounts of heavier elements forming. Our star, far from being a generation-one star, has numerous elements contaminating the hydrogen already; the absorption lines of these elements are what produce the spectral lines astronomers use to determine the chemical makeup of a given stellar body. There are stars that have a fairly sizable iron content, enough to be observed across vast interstellar gulfs; they burn 'cool' compared to non-iron-heavy stars, but the reaction is hardly stifled.

One final detail, in passing - while a star is, indeed, a titanic mass of fusing gas, the pressures at the core are far from what we think of as gaseous - the nuclei are jammed at absurd densities. A slug of iron is likely to be sublimated and eroded by the pressure drafts long before it gets anywhere near the stellar core. Go to Comment
The Star Hammer
Items  (Ranged Weapons)   (Campaign Defining)
Siren no Orakio's comment on 2008-12-25 07:54 PM
The Physics is complex, and it's Christmas. Even I have a family, Manfred.

To drop a supernova immediately requires approximately 1.44 solar masses of Iron - This is the Chandrasekhar limit, the "fuse" of a supernova.1 Very, very large masses of iron (think Neptune/Jupiter+), however, will cause some very... uncomfortable immediate alterations of the stellar cycle. It will likely "pulse" in diameter over hundreds of years as it contracts from the loss of heat, then bursts outwards as the heat generated by contraction reignites fusion of the lighter elements, overcoming gravity until it cools enough to stop fusion, etc, etc, with the size of the pulse directly controlled by the relative proportion of iron added to the star. In time, the star will reach a comparatively stable phase. It will have shifted along its life span by a certain degree, by the relative increase in concentration of iron in the core - given the high temperature, and comparative availability of exothermic reactions available, the exothermic reactions will prevail, although they will be dampened by the iron. This is the normal condition inside an 'old' star. Initial pulses may be very large, enough to sweep up everything within a couple hundred million miles of the center of the star, if there is sufficient iron to initiate the death of the star. (It is expected that when Sol dies, Mars will be somewhat closer to the red-giant phase's surface than Mercury is now.)

Given sufficient iron, however, this could still be a highly effective weapon. Personally, if I had a hundred ton rock to fling, I would probably fling them at the target planets, but, that's just me - blowing holes the size of the Yucatan in ecospheres tends to make them uninhabitable too. Doesn't stop it from being a good idea.

1: For those who want the whole thing, the Chandrasekhar limit is the mass at which the gravitation over a dense body is capable of overcoming the repulsion between electrons, crushing the mass into a single body of continuous neutrally-charged nuclear mass, as the electrons join to the protons to form neutrons, and shed excess mass-energy, in a tremendous release - When it occurs in nature, it tears stars apart from the inside, shedding their outer layers with a massive burst of light and neutrinos, a supernova. If the remaining mass is beneath a certain critical limit, believed to be between 1.5 and 3 solar masses, the collapsing core will stabilize itself as the relevant quantum mechanical exclusion principles create an outwards pressure to keep the neutrons as separate entities, a neutron star. Theoretically, if a star is above that mass, yet beneath another, poorly understood limit, the neutrons can fuse into a single particle, a degenerate state referred to as 'strange matter', while this stellar corpse is tenetively dubbed a quark star. Above that unknown limit, gravity triumphs, and the object retreats behind a singularity, nature divides by zero, and we call it a black hole. Go to Comment
The Star Hammer
Items  (Ranged Weapons)   (Campaign Defining)
Siren no Orakio's comment on 2014-07-02 09:41 PM
Star Hammer, Mk II:

Feared throughout inhabited space, there is not a single insterspecies governing body that has not outlawed that most horrible of weapons, the Star Hammer.

Perhaps the most terrifying notion is its simplicity, its stealth: Consisting of little more than two outsized magnetic bottles, one full of anti-protons, the other full of positrons, their support system, a cooling laser, and a massive tungsten hull, the Star Hammer is tricky to detect, and serves little more purpose than the complete destruction of habitable star systems.

On use, it is given a solid shove sunwards, from as near as the launching craft dares approach, and allowed to 'fall' through space into the surface of the sun, where the cooling laser finally begins to fire, allowing it to drop deep into the star, well into the convection cells, where it is simply allowed to evaporate, the contents of the magnetic bottles released naturally into one another, forming anti-hydrogen, then into the star itself, causing an enormous detonation.

On a 'bad' detonation, when the yield is too low for the affected star, a great solar flare is formed, a candle blazing far into the reaches of space, potentially obliterating single planets, in the case of alignment. This can be calculated, but while difficult to achieve in practice, even near misses will play havoc with the magnetic fields of planets, searing hardy electronics, and enveloping the world in frighteningly massive aurora.

On a 'moderate' detonation, the Star Hammer will ring the star much like a normal hammer striking a bell, causing the surface, and the radiation from it, to pulsate, with a cycle rate lasting from days to years, slowly dampening over aeons. Those worlds that most closely circle it will be immediately incinerated, as the surface of the star explodes outwards and devours them, at the same time, dimming the sun and pitching the further planets into deep cold - only to be reversed as the surface of the sun falls inward once more, driving the fusion cycles of the star harder and faster, causing it to blaze with light and heat until the surface begins to boil outwards once more, ultimately sterilizing what manages to stay in orbit around the star.

Most rarely, when the blast is large enough, and placed well enough, the Star Hammer may cause the outer shell of the star to be blown away completely as it expands away from the first contraction, the leading wave obliterating most of the star system... Go to Comment
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