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Silveressa's Voting Practices
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Pieh's comment on 2011-07-23 12:34 PM


Very nice article. It certainly makes a lot of sense, is logical, and an easy read. I doubt it will change the way I vote much (Though I find it already creeping up on my as I vote on this one). My voting practices, like much of what I do, are nowhere near as coherent as this. I applaud and thank you for being able to write this and for taking the time to write this. Good work.


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Silveressa's Voting Practices
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Scrasamax's comment on 2011-07-23 08:14 AM


Good, and concise. Written with what feels like a minimal amount of personal emotional involvement. This would get a thumbtack from me, to keep it up front, or when someone starts going on about misspelling words or what is the most appropriate way to vote.


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Silveressa's Voting Practices
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Cheka Man's comment on 2011-07-23 08:37 AM
Only voted Go to Comment
Silveressa's Voting Practices
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Ancient Gamer's comment on 2011-07-24 04:51 AM


Nice effort, and I would like to add that people vote as people will.



This one fact has caused untold amounts of anguish here at the citadel.



I have experienced my true 5.0 subs, voted that high by a number of my peers, been torn from its lofty perch by a 3.0 vote, and worse. It has even been by people who openly dislike me.



I know how emotionally entangled we get with our subs, and with the votes we receive, but I wish to echo valadaar: "Be thankful for a vote. Be thankful for a comment. Dance with joy for both, for many subs receive little, or no, attention.



I have myself been hammered in the past. Accused of voting subs low with spite and malice (and against people I adore even). This was one of the main reasons I stopped being an active citadel member. This is also the reason why I am so harsh and unpalatable in my reaction to "vote whining". Yes, yes, I have myself, on multiple occassions been the primary whiner. :)



Not my intent to hijack the comment thread of a well written sub with very helpful advice on voting patterns. I just want to point out that we need to give leeway to the less than stellar critics we receive as well, even when the criticism is delivered by people we despise, or who might despise us.



They only have one vote you know. Multiple user accounts are usually detected.

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Silveressa's Voting Practices
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axlerowes's comment on 2011-07-28 01:37 PM


BANG!



IRONY,



the rating system described above  evaluates subs based on their ability to add fresh material to genre items and their usefulness in relation to the game.  



Thus the literal message of this sub is that a sub that expands the gaming universe of the reader is a good sub.  Yet this sub does not do this, it dives right into the meta content of this website.  



For a post that is all about the author, it lacks self awareness.   A self aware aside sometimes distracts from posts that are pieces of fiction or ones that are trying to make a point, but this post is all about you. It doesn't even have an argument or a purpose. It is already self aware, no need to cut corners.



Perhaps Pieh was commenting on when said it may be effecting his vote.  Maybe this is so apparent to everyone that pointing it out just seemed banal, but if so I didn't catch an intended irony in anyones' response.


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Silveressa's Voting Practices
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axlerowes's comment on 2011-07-29 07:41 AM
Did you down vote my comment? Your intention did not elude me and you should know that. I believe that you are upset by comment and being condescending and dismissive. Will you own that?

I am saying that the literal message of your post regarding the value of posts and how that system would rate this post smacks of irony. I think it is funny. I didn't speak to the value of this post, but I hoped my comment might give you something reflect on and to consider even more why you vote the way you do. Are you saying that you don't see your post as ironic?

As your question, I don't remember Mourngrym's similar sub, but if I had to pick a favorite meta-sub it would cheka's 30 ways to be a good strolenite. And in that case I liked it more for its organization and pastoral qualities. Yet its does get at some of the mores of the website, which I would have found useful years ago. But was it Mourngrym that said "if you read something comment on it." Go to Comment
Silveressa's Voting Practices
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valadaar's comment on 2013-04-30 07:12 AM
Only voted Go to Comment
Silveressa's Voting Practices
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Silveressa's comment on 2011-07-28 02:23 PM
So you're saying Mourngrym's similar sub falls into the same category and a better understanding how some people vote is of no use to you?

Perhaps you over looked the section this article falls into: Articles
Rules and Advice: Citadel Help

This was an article for citadel help, as in helping Strolenites understand how I vote, (and perhaps give them pause to consider the reasons behind why they vote the way they do?)

Somehow this intention eluded you and you find the sub to be of no use to you; in which case feel free to move on, ignore it and post on something more useful to you.
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Silveressa's Voting Practices
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Silveressa's comment on 2011-07-29 06:09 PM
As the author of a sub an up or down vote is worth + or - 5 points from me, so if I down voted you it would show -5, not -1. (If you like I can down vote the comment to show the -5 in action? :P j/k)

As for Mourngrym's similar sub, I mention his sub, complete with a link to it in my very first paragraph, so I'm a little surprised you don't remember mourn writing one.

As for my reply, I understood the unintended irony, but did feel as if you were singling out my sub as somewhat useless, which I tried to point out was not my intent in my original reply. (Given you didn't vote on my sub and only commented I saw no reason to up/down vote your comment.) Regardless thanks for clarifying this with your followup post, it makes more sense to me now.
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Silveressa's Voting Practices
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Kassy's comment on 2011-07-22 11:20 PM


3.0



This should have something like a front page sticky. To aid new and old.


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Silveressa's Voting Practices
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Kassy's comment on 2013-05-30 06:14 AM
Revising my vote.

4.0/5

The level of detail and points covered more than deserve it. Go to Comment
Silveressa's Voting Practices
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MysticMoon's comment on 2011-07-24 12:20 AM


A well thought out set of guidelines and definite food for thought.


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The Philadelphia Shipyards
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Strolen's comment on 2011-07-17 07:27 AM
Please visit the forum topic A Discussion on Personal Rating Standards to continue any replies on this thread. We should try to keep a majority of comments directly related to the submission.

Thanks! Go to Comment
The Philadelphia Shipyards
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Strolen's comment on 2011-08-14 08:15 AM


Could be used as the birth of a zombie invasion!



Addition of all the ships and the many plot ideas were great.


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The Philadelphia Shipyards
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EchoMirage's comment on 2011-07-19 05:18 AM


Like Val said, it's good, and deserves a good rating. Alas, toxic waste, mutants and ruins have been done before; the added novelty lies in the fact that a large part of the setting are ships.



Also, them utants don't have too much space allocated to them, and seem vaguely generic.



So, it's good, and useful, though I'd elaborate on a) the native 'fauna' , think up some more original plot hooks, and spice the prose up a bit.


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The Philadelphia Shipyards
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Cheka Man's comment on 2011-07-13 09:34 PM
Only voted Go to Comment
The Philadelphia Shipyards
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Chaosmark's comment on 2012-03-02 07:19 PM


I like the overall feel of this. It reminds me of some of my favorite submissions: The Lost City of Akelor, The Field of 10000 Skulls, The Mountain of Boats, etc. It's got a good solid history to it, and contains enough content to be a recurring location. You can use it for any number of plots, and it provides those plots with a minimum of effort thanks to the details and history.



Very nicely done.


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The Philadelphia Shipyards
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Murometz's comment on 2011-07-19 09:06 PM


I like how this reads. It gives you a bit of verisimilitude and the juicy mundane, and mixes it with the shadow of "other things". I enjoy scenarios like these. It is these type of set-ups that my jaded players enjoy, because A. They don't know what will happen next and don't know what to expect and B. No matter how you slice it, when "Philadelphia" replaces "Gaglavmagrog, City of Gargoyles" it gets a bit sexier. (note, i don't play world of darkness, or cthulhu anything, or any kind of horror on the market, or any published game really---I just make my players guess)


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The Philadelphia Shipyards
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axlerowes's comment on 2012-03-02 05:21 AM


There is just so much good to say about this one, ships are already romantic things and very personal things.  I have been working on a ship scrap yard like the ones in Alang India.  But after reading this I realize what I had left out.  Each of these ships could be post, the plots could be a post but instead you give this whole thing all intertwined.  



 



 



 



http://docspace.ca/film/Shipbreakers


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The Philadelphia Shipyards
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axlerowes's comment on 2012-03-03 08:24 PM


 



The Golitsyn (SECRET SUNKEN STEAM SHIP FROM CZARIST RUSSIA!) (try saying that three times)



In 1863, during the height of the American Civil War the Russian Atlantic and Pacific Fleets wintered in the Union Ports on the North America.  Like all things Russian, the gesture was significant but the exact meaning was enigmatic.  The Lincoln administration spun it as a sign of support for the Union cause and as counter weight to the threat of French and English intervention on the Confederate behalf.  Others have suggested that Russia believed itself to be on the brink of war with England and France over the question of Polish sovereignty and wanted to prevent their fleets from becoming ice bound or blockaded. While most of the Russian Atlantic fleet laid anchor in New York, one ship, the Steam frigate Aleksandr Mikhailovich Golitsyn, arrived in Philadelphia. Whether the Golitsyn had an official mission to Philadelphia or was “separated” from the fleet during the crossing will never be known.  Confederate spies had learned of the Golistyn’s approach and decided not to let Russian influence go uncontested.  Considering what the Golitsyn was carrying it is also possible and likely that other parties had found a way to influence the Confederate agents towards their own end.



The day after he (According to the author's memory of Tom Clancy novels, Russian ships are always male) set anchor, Confederate saboteurs boarded and blew the boiler on the Golitsyn.  The ship, most of her crew and all of her cargo sank in less than a quarter hour.  The Golitsyn’s presence and its sinking was kept a secret and never officially acknowledged by either the Union government or the Russian Admiralty. The Lincoln administration did not wish to advertise the success Confederate saboteurs.  The Russian Admiralty was not truly interested or capable of becoming involved in an American Civil War and did not wish to deal with the consequences of acknowledging an isolated act of aggression against their forces by the Confederacy. Today the half buried wreckage of the Golitsyn sits under the decaying remains of the Philadelphia Shipyard’s “younger” retirees.  But thanks to his cargo, the Golitsyn has not entirely been forgotten.



In the 1800s pogroms against Jews in Russia and Eastern Europe had been on the rise.  Immigration of Eastern European Jews to the United States had also been on the rise. The USA of the 1860s presented an interesting problem for the Jews, true there had been a rise of anti-Semitism manifested by General Order Number 11 and wide spread scapegoating of their communities all over the North.  But there was also hope, Lincoln had over turned Order Number 11, they allowed Jewish Chaplains into the military and there was always the promise of the American Constitution that a man was free to have his religion. It seemed clear that even after centuries of living side by side the Russian masses were never going to accept Jews as true countrymen.  It was decided that one of greatest treasure of the Eastern European Jewish Communities would be smuggled out of Europe and into the United States.  The captain of the Golitsyn agreed to carry the treasure to the United States and this treasure is still with the Golitsyn’s wreckage.



The Golitsyn was carrying the Golem.  After the Golem’s creation in Prague it was moved secretly around Europe, staying mostly dormant (met), only occasionally be reanimated to protect communities but he was always a power too great to be wielded by flawed mortal men (maybe if they had let women study…).  If the Golem is brought up from the wreckage he can be animated by changing the inscription on his head from met to emet.  After that he will serve to protect his master and his family from any perceived threats. Let us hope the calligrapher speaks Hebrew.



  There was also a survivor of the Golitsyn, a Russian-Jew, who hid his identity and settled in Philadelphia. His family has quietly passed the story of the Golitsyn and the Golem down for generations.  Plus there are still rumors (in circles that gossip about Jewish mysticism) that the Golem was smuggled to Philadelphia in the 1860s, but these rumors have forgotten the Golitsyn.



There is also another connection to present time in the form of an hourglass.  The Golitsyn still used watch hourglasses and when the boiler blew the mid-shipman in command of the deck watched his life and the sands of the watch hourglass drain the simultaneously.  That glass survives to this day and still has air in it. If it ever comes free from the wood and rot binding it, the hourglass will float to the surface.  The Mid-shipman’s spirit or psionic shadow is linked to the glass. Whoever, finds it will be haunted until at least some piece (the hour glass counts) of the Mid-shipman and his young lover (who was also a sailor on the ship) are brought up and returned to their home city of Perm (third class mail would be fine).  

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