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Beneath the Willow
Plots  (Duty)   (Single-Storyline)
Scrasamax's comment on 2004-09-30 06:34 AM
To explain the option, or the reason not to attack would require me to shed some light on my former, and albeit sometimes difficult gaming group. I had a player who I would desribe as Chaotic, if imprisoned, he would attempt to commit suicide by trying to swallow his tongue. If someone seemed like they should be treated with respect, and he disagreed, he would cast a spell at them, usually something with fire in it. Now, most of the time he was a good gamer, but there was always the possibility of that entirely chaotic act erupting. I learned to be prepared for that, rather than kicking him out of the group. Besides, most of the time, we played at his house, so, either you have a psychotic episode, or you learn to deal with it. Go to Comment
Beneath the Willow
Plots  (Duty)   (Single-Storyline)
EchoMirage's comment on 2004-09-30 06:37 AM
Two thumbs up. A very thoughtful and intelligent quest.
You could also include philosophical/theological debate because of an incompatibility of beliefs the warrior held in his life and those of the Vale guardians. I am moved, and grant a 5. Go to Comment
Beneath the Willow
Plots  (Duty)   (Single-Storyline)
Cheka Man's comment on 2005-01-12 06:04 PM
Beneath the Willow
Plots  (Duty)   (Single-Storyline)
Cheka Man's comment on 2006-10-17 05:37 PM
I wonder how I missed voting for this? 5/5 Go to Comment
Beneath the Willow
Plots  (Duty)   (Single-Storyline)
Ancient Gamer's comment on 2004-10-02 02:43 AM
As always Scrasamax has produced high quality epic fantasy with a refreshing twist of originality. Go to Comment
Beneath the Willow
Plots  (Duty)   (Single-Storyline)
esaquam's comment on 2004-09-30 06:25 AM
Cool. Pleasantly melancholy. Great opportunity for some prepared role-playing: Anything from a full bardic lament with bagpipe to Sam Gamgee's impromptu poem for Gandalf.

You could also make this the denoument of a prior adventure in which said NPC had played a major role in helping the PC's, but been mortally wounded - not killed outright, but removed from the action so the PC's will finish that adventure on their own. They return in triumph to hear the dying request.

Variation on "It's Religion Stupid": The hero cannot enter the valley until some incomplete deed is done or some past misdeed undone. The Valley will guard the body for a specific length of time while the PC's attend to that quest (so we don't have a farce of hauling a rotting corpse over hill and dale).

Also, there's no need to make the attendants anything that the PC's can attack - for me, at least, the option that the PC's could fight their way to a resolution in the Valley itself detracts from the mood. The Spirit of the Valley could set them on a twisting path that always puts the Valley just over the next rise, or be an invisible force that allows the PC's but not the body to enter, etc., and then the party needs to figure out the explanation of that. Go to Comment
Beneath the Willow
Plots  (Duty)   (Single-Storyline)
Dragon Lord's comment on 2005-05-03 08:43 AM
Would fit nicely into a campaign where the emphasis is on role-playing rather than combat - just the sort of thing I prefer to see

Unusual and original idea - 5/5 Go to Comment
Beneath the Willow
Plots  (Duty)   (Single-Storyline)
Silveressa's comment on 2011-07-26 08:38 PM


A nicely adventure to spring on the party after they have become attached to a helpful NPC that accompanied them on adventures in the past. For a variation one could also substitute a relative of one of the PC's to add a more personal touch to the adventure.

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Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
Barbarian Horde's comment on 2005-04-26 08:20 AM
It is better to be in the right hand of the devil than in his path. As long as i serve him, i am immune. Go to Comment
Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
Barbarian Horde's comment on 2008-07-22 11:26 AM
"Once they were all laid to rest, she sat in front of them, and sang their lament. Then, she cried. It was a soft thing, and entirely selfish. Their pain was done and gone, and she was left to mourn them, and to live on."

This speaks tons about the religion and character, particularly the 'soft and selfish' part. Great work. Go to Comment
Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
CaptainPenguin's comment on 2004-09-20 09:57 PM
The only thing that I didn't like in this is that, and I know this sounds stupid, I feel that the names didn't fit together well. Anubis (Egyptian), Sima Ling (sounds vaguely Chinese, though it probably isn't supposed to be), Pater Myron (sounds European. I don't like the way that Pater, a somewhat Christian-sounding priestly title, works in relation to Anubis). Be that as it may, this is a pretty good character. I can't find any real issues, and, though it isn't my favorite, I feel that it deserves a...

4/5. Go to Comment
Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
CaptainPenguin's comment on 2005-10-20 10:27 PM
Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
EchoMirage's comment on 2004-09-21 02:18 AM
A priesthood of death can be essential in easing the fear of death or dying, and helping overcome the pain ... they could even be experts at concocting drugs to ease pain, or help the dying spend their last days in a pleasant dream. "It does not hurt. You just fall asleep" ... and let me tell you, the relatives would be much happier to see a smiling great-grandfather in his deathbed, than one half-mad with the pain of cancer devouring his body.
They also could teach the old the way of the underworld, and how to plead before the final judgment, or for a better reincarnation.

While Sima's assassinations are reasonable (she sends them to be judged by Anubis for their misdeed), I rather doubt that she'd murder them brutally - I think she'd make one clean cut, or use a garotte, or poison, but she would not want to see them suffer. Go to Comment
Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
EchoMirage's comment on 2005-04-26 02:40 PM
I think about a thread in the idea scroll: "Different looks at gods" ... re-defining the Gods of Death, the Sun, Love, War.. etc. Go to Comment
Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
Cheka Man's comment on 2004-09-20 07:32 PM
5/5 Very good in that it shows that not all that seems evil really is evil. Go to Comment
Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
Dragon Lord's comment on 2005-04-26 09:54 AM
Great backstory, strong motivations, and a nice moral twist - pretty much what I've come to expect from you Scras

Solid believable character - 5/5 Go to Comment
Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
Murometz's comment on 2006-03-04 09:22 PM
Often, the better the submission the less I have to say about it.

Captain- you can change the names, baby! Go to Comment
Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
valadaar's comment on 2013-04-28 07:38 PM
This would make an excellent PC background as well and is a great view from the other side. Just as I prefer my white with a ting of black, so too black should be tinged with white.
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Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
RGTraynor's comment on 2011-06-25 02:04 AM


Heck, the "Old Fears Come Again" plot hook's enough for a high vote, all in of itself.  Too damn often, the moral absolutism of D&D and its ilk manifests itself in the notion that if the other guys are "Evil," just about any bestial thing you do to them is okay, because, well, they're Evil, doncha know?


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Sima Ling
NPCs  (Major)   (Religious)
hylandpad's comment on 2011-06-25 10:04 PM


I for one, like how you mixed eastern, middle eastern, and western influences. Using the latin "Pater" as a priestly title is always a good way to denote a sort of organized religious hierarchy. Using Anubis as a venerable death god, is recognizable by just about anyone who has taken a world history class.



I also like the old idea of a venerable death god, rather than a satanic death-worshipping God, where the clerics give aide and comfort to the relatives of the deceased. It's a refreshing trend away from the typical fantasy view of death worshipping priests from whatever "Temple of doom" is around, who bathe in the blood of their kidnapped sacrifical virgins. 



I like it. 3.5/5

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