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Auchinduin Deep Iron Mine
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Cheka Man's comment on 2006-02-28 07:22 PM
Now this I love and hope to give an HOH point to tomorrow. Go to Comment
Auchinduin Deep Iron Mine
Locations  (City)   (Mountains)
Pariah's comment on 2006-03-08 06:30 AM
Yeah, these two posts together are GrrrrrrrrrEAT!!!! Go to Comment
Auchinduin Deep Iron Mine
Locations  (City)   (Mountains)
Spark's comment on 2006-03-01 04:28 PM
Very cool. It has a great story, but what got me was the atmosphere created by the description of the mine. It would be very freaky to be so far from the surface, and would make for some great gameplay moments -

...the characters turn around to find that their guide's face has just melted off, just as the last torch flickers out.. Go to Comment
Auchinduin Deep Iron Mine
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Dozus's comment on 2012-10-29 08:08 AM
The clathrates are a neat idea, and I like the place you've built for one to live here. Go to Comment
Auchinduin Deep Iron Mine
Locations  (City)   (Mountains)
Murometz's comment on 2006-02-28 08:16 PM
Richbutbusy? :)

interesting scenario on top of being a 'location'. Great details- overbuilt buildings, mining taboos, cast of characters. I like how you structure your subs, this being a perfect example. Will be reading clathrate next. I wont have a HoH vote tomorrow, unlike Cheka, but would use it if I did. Go to Comment
Auchinduin Deep Iron Mine
Locations  (City)   (Mountains)
Murometz's comment on 2007-04-12 08:29 PM
BUMP! RICHBUTBUSY! Go to Comment
Auchinduin Deep Iron Mine
Locations  (City)   (Mountains)
valadaar's comment on 2013-06-23 07:53 PM
Could have sworn I voted and commented on this awesome location. Addressed.

Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
Systems  (Societal/ Cultural)   (Defining)
Barbarian Horde's comment on 2008-11-23 07:33 AM
Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone were my childhood. If you have children then you should offer them the magical realms of Fighting Fantasy. Peter Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
Systems  (Societal/ Cultural)   (Defining)
manfred's comment on 2006-02-08 11:18 AM
Really, I want to see this complete. You have a higher vote reserved already. ;) Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
Systems  (Societal/ Cultural)   (Defining)
manfred's comment on 2006-02-18 10:15 AM
There is still the Dwarwen Runecasting, which tries to put a dwarwen flavour on the topic; without sacrifices or common use of blood. It may be adaptable for your purpose (hint here :) ). Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
Systems  (Societal/ Cultural)   (Defining)
CaptainPenguin's comment on 2006-05-24 05:05 PM
This is a fantastically good series... Fully worthy of a 5/5. Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
Systems  (Societal/ Cultural)   (Defining)
MoonHunter's comment on 2006-02-08 10:10 AM
Now keep going, you will be done eventually :)

Let us know when you want help. Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
Systems  (Societal/ Cultural)   (Defining)
Scrasamax's comment on 2006-02-07 02:10 PM
The Art of Summoning
Lesson 1: Not all Sorcerers were black robes, and pointy hats.

Put away the fancy notions of conjuring mythical beasts to do your whim, the art of summoning is a precise, and dangerous art, though without a doubt one of the most potent of the low arts.

Charisma is the key attribute of the summoner, as he must charm, seduce, cajole, and otherwise entice the subject of his spell. This art is not merely the conjuring of monsters and elementals, it contains that, but also contains much more, for the path of the summoner is sixfold.

Song of Beasts
Animals of the earth are the simplest to summon, and at times, the most valuable. Only rudimentary knowledge of the Art of Summoning is required for at least minimal effect. Most who know the Song of Beasts, as the practice is called are themselves known as beastmasters, and other such titles.

The Song of Beasts is two-fold. The first, and easier application is the summoning of an animal. This is specific, and not a Aquaman-esque Friends of the Deep. If the Sorcerer wishes to summon a pack of wolves, he must prepare the proper ritual, and there must be wolves to summon. There is no 'cast a spell and see what comes' because the answer is nothing. It might be suitable to retain a list of what animals the sorcerer is able to summon, and expand from that list in a logical manner.

The second application is the control of an animal once summoned. This is a step, or increment more difficult than the summoning of said animal. It is one thing to draw a beasts attention, and another to command it to your will. As a sorcerers ability in the Song of the Beast increases, so does his ability to command the beasts he does bend to his will.

The difficulty of the summoning depends on three factors, the intelligence of the animal, or it's willpower, it disposition to being summoned, and distance. More intelligent animals are more wary, and require extra effort to summon. Some animals are not opposed to being summoned, dogs, horses and other domesticated animals are easy to summon, it has been bred into their nature. A wild falcon, or tiger would be more difficult as they are fiercely solitary animals. Last but not least, the closer they are, the less time it takes to summon them, to an extent.

Some examples:
The Lone Ranger, or any other horseman capable of calling his horse with naught but a whistle. Impressive not because the horse comes to a whistle, but because the horse comes only to His whistle.

The Constable who has a strong relationship with his hounds. His commands are are quickly enacted by his dogs. Attack, guard, find, track, and half a dozen other tricks and talents, all at the command of a single sorcerer.

The Beastmaster, perhaps one of the better known examples, and certainly not a bad one. Commands his animal allies, but those who observe do not see the exchang of master and servant, as he treats the animals excedingly well. A lessen there, the summoner who treats his charges well may not have so hard of a time the next time he calls upon them. Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
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Scrasamax's comment on 2006-02-07 02:11 PM
The Art of Summoning
Lesson 2: Mortals always overestimate their importance in the greater sense of things.

A dangerous bit of knowledge here. Summoning mortals (Humans, dwarves, orcs, etc) is easy, in fact, it is as easy as summoning animals. There are a few differences to consider first.

The summoning of mortals lacks the dual nature of summon/command that is present in animals. Some argue that this is the divine order of free will over predestination. Others claim that human beings are far to complex to be yoked by the simple magics that manipulate lesser beasts.

To summon a mortal, the sorcerer must A: Know the name of the person to be summoned, and B: must have a sample of their person available. Thus, many people, especially adventurers and mages will affect 'working names' to protect their real names from those who would take advantage of them by summoning them away from their own lives and families.

A summoned individual can attempt to resist a summons spell, but it requires either great distance, or willpower greater than that of the sorcerer who is attempting the summons. Summoning mortals is a resistable action also. Thus, resistance to summoning is innate, and tied to said person's willpower. A weak-willed and unassertive person would find resisting a summons very difficult if not impossible. The same indifferent person would also make a very poor sorcerer, as most everyone would be able to resist his summons.

Some Examples:
The villians cavalry arrives just in time...right after the main villian lit a red candle while taunting the PCs, stalling for time, while he cast a spell to summon his best assassins.

The Sorcerer-Judge uses the summons power to bring a wanted criminal into custody, regardless of guilt or otherwise.

Okay, so summoning mortals didnt have the same zing as summoning monsters, but it depends on your view of human free will versus predestination.

Naxt...Demons. I'll try not to be cliche and laugh villianiously.
Bwa-Ha-Ha-Ha.... Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
Systems  (Societal/ Cultural)   (Defining)
Scrasamax's comment on 2006-02-07 02:12 PM
The Art of Summoning
Lesson 3: Never summon anything you cannot feasibly banish. This is the leading cause of death among summoners

Diabolism is a perilously simple art, one that invites sloppy rituals and hastily prepared spells. Summoning a demon is a simple matter, summoning a demon that is controlled is another matter completely. The main cause is that the majority of rituals to summon demons were in fact created by demons as a way to enter the material realm. A ritual might be 95% correct except for a small part to control the demon once summoned. Once summoned, the demon kills the summoner, and is free until their ability to retain in creation expires, or they are driven back to their home realms.

Demons require a sacrifice to even notice a ritual summoning. This can be a simple sacrifice of an animal strongly opposed by the demon, such as slaughtering a cockerel to summon a basilisk demon, as the cockerel in mythology slew the basilisk. Weaker demons require lesser sacrifice, while only the strongest of demons demands human sacrifice. Such demons are the most likely to have delivered flawed summoning rituals to summoners.

An intelligent sorcerer will not summon a demon unless he is proficient in the Art of Warding, and has at least one ward, if not more in place before summoning a demon and bargaining with it. There in lies the danger of dealing with demons.

It is easy to strike a bargain with a demon, but much harder to strike a pact that serves the summoner more than the demon summoned. Simple demons are limited in power, but also limited in their ability to manipulate and coerce a summoner into inferior terms. More potent demons are correspondingly more cunning, and almost always end up with the better end of the deal.

Deeds completed by demons, ill-gotten gains, and demonic lore all carry a specific and identifiable taint. Only the foolish summoner resorts to demonic pacts rather than seeking another way to achieve a goal.

Ye have been warned

Lesson 4: Elementals Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
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Scrasamax's comment on 2006-02-07 02:12 PM
The Art of Summoning
Lesson 4: If you play with fire you will get burned, this applies to all elements.

Elementals are not difficult to summon. Control, as always is the difficulty. Unlike demons, Elementals are not quite as difficult to control, as they lack the whole pain and lies impetus to their bargaining. An elemental will generally expect some sort of chimage, or payment for their summoning.

Once a deal is made, and payment is also made, an elemental will serve a sorcerer loyaly so long as they are not commanded into a life ending situation, or forced to go against their elemental nature. Thus commanding an earth elemental to help build a wall, or to reinforce an existing location would be readily obeyed, while a command to leap off the cliff to plummet like a catapult shot down on enemies below would not be likely followed.

Summoning elementals is easy, but often expensive in terms of sacrifice and offerings. Fire and wind elementals enjoy expensive incenses, and dried herbs, while earth elementals will require precious metals and jewels. Water elementals will ask for the most expensive of drinks, or in rare cases, the fluid of life, blood.

Next, the dead. Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
Systems  (Societal/ Cultural)   (Defining)
Scrasamax's comment on 2006-02-07 02:13 PM
The Art of Summoning
Lesson 5: Children shouldnt play with dead things

Any compentent sorcerer can tell you that death is not the end of life, merely a change in aspect. The soul continues on, most are drawn on to their reward, or recycled back into creation, for such is the way of things. A few, however, linger on lost between the worlds, trapped in a crumbling shadow of our own existance. A well versed sorcerer can learn to summon these restless shades and extol knowledges and services from them.

To summon a ghost, the summoner must procede to the place of either the slains death, or to their grave should they have one. An offering and ritual incantation are made, if appeased, the desired ghost will appear. This is always helped by proper sacrifices, such as blood, or things strongly associated with the ghost, such as the blood of a mighty stallion to summon a heroic horsemans ghost, or a song played for the ghost of a bard. Offering blood doesnt always mean killing the source of blood.

Most ghosts lack the strength to harm the living, but those few who can, will. Thus a smart summoner will have a proper ward in place before summoning an unknown ghost.

Ghosts can be induced to spy upon others, or offer their wisdom from beyond the grave. They will offer anything they know, so long as the actuallity of undeath is not questioned, for the laws of the living go against the laws of the dead. Stronger ghosts can be compelled to hunt the living and harass them in their subtle way, or striking them in a far less subtle way.

The most common cause for summoning the dead is for purposes of communication, and gaining lost information. It should be remembered that what they pass along is what they knew in life, or what they recall from their period of undeath, it is not default truth or canon. The dead make poor soldiers, and are best suited to their darker, passive role in creation.

A note of warning. Ghosts are driven by, and ruled by petty passions. They have some item, cause, or person that has anchored them in creation. Threatening that anchor can either cause the ghost to fly into a rage, or to become compliant to the summoners will. They will not willingly go against this anchor, and most will desperately protect their anchors and will go to great lengths to keep them secret from summoners.

Lo, I see my father...

Next, Higher Spirits, or Gods Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
Systems  (Societal/ Cultural)   (Defining)
Scrasamax's comment on 2006-02-07 02:14 PM
The Art of Summoning
Lesson 6: Any god, regardless of power, will be offended by a little reference

There are entities that are not demons, ghosts, or elementals, for those is reserved the title of 'Little God', or 'Spirit'. Summoners are cautioned against calling for the services of these beings as they are not summoned, nor controlled, they are beckoned to, and negotiated with. Powerful spirits are among the most dangerous entities in creation as their power is mightly, and not limited in the manner of demonic bondage, or the laws of the elemental courts.

Each spirit will have certain things attributed to it, and the larger and more potent the spirit, the harder it is to summon, and the more knowledgable and capable it is. Thus, in theory, the Gods could themselves be summoned, but their shear power and breadth means that the cry of one sorcerous summoner will be ignored completely, and a constantly calling sorcerer might be visited by a lesser servitor of the god to:

A.) help if the summoner has good reason to call, and do so overstepping the clergy of the god, or

B.) punish the summoner for being so arrogant.

This is an extreme example. A better example might be a summoner calling up the spirit of a great river, as opposed to a water elemental. He would have to make a proper offering to the spirit, and state what he desires from the spirit.

If the spirit accepts the offering, it will do as the sorcerer asks. If not, their could be anything from a tacit denial to the spirit assaulting and punishing the sorcerer for being an uppity git.

It is of supreme importance to remember manners and etiquette when dealing with the celestial spirits.


Thus, the Art of Summoning is Complete.
Next: The Art of Warding Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
Systems  (Societal/ Cultural)   (Defining)
Scrasamax's comment on 2006-02-07 02:15 PM
The Art of Warding
Lesson 1: Always always always always practice safer sorcery, use a ward.

First of all, I would like to thank everyone who passed the exams on the Art of summoning. With any luck, the rest of the entries here will be by far more brief. Summoning, being the large and diverse art that it is, required a very large amount of space, and time. Without further ado, on to the sublime and essential art of warding.

Warding is the simplest of the arts, and almost every sorcerer worthy of such title will be at the very least, aware of the basics of this art. There are many sorts of wards in common mythology, the string of garlic to repulse the vampire, the line of salt against restless spirits, and the manifold ways to thwart the fair folk. These become the tools and tokens of the Warder.

In almost all cases, a ward has a physical component, be it the garlic, or the prepared lines of salt, or the common pentacle, or circle of protection. The amount of time, and the value of the materials used determines the strength and durability of the ward, along with a skill test using the sorcerers dexterity and their occult knowledge. A hastily inscribed circle of protection drawn in fifteen minutes with charcoal is not going to be as strong and resilient as the circle inscribed in the floor itself, and then ceremonially filled with powdered charcoal from a brazier blessed by a high priest of the God of good luck.

The low art of warding does not create walls of flame, or crackling sheets of electricity. The ward is an invisible, intangible thing. The hastily prepared warda bove would offer resistance to strong spirits, but they would be able to penetrate it by sheer will. The later ward would be as strong as steel, and impervious as plexiglass. Nothing less than a divinity would be able to penetrate such a carefully inscribed circle of protection.

Weak wards are the most common. It is unnaturally rare that a ward is even required against greater spirits and demons as they are bound by their own unknown laws. Most wards laid counter lesser minions and spirits. A forest village will have wards of protection against fickle forest sprites and mischievious pixies. A similar moutain community would be warded against rock sprites, and against boggarts and rock-biters. Large cities are commonly warded against restless ghosts, with individuals being responsible for the warding of their own homes and neighborhoods.

Wards are unlimited in potential size. A single sorcerer can ward a home against ghosts, or a mansion if he uses properly instructed assistants. A small army of assistants could be used to actually make a ward around and entire neighborhood, or even a city. The cost in materials would be staggering and the ward would have to be refreshed yearly, but the value of having a city free from ghosts, or the less exotic ward versus bears, for say, a northern city might be well worth the cost. In the larger cities, it becomes the task of the Warding Circle, or guild to maintain the wards of a city.

Ward Contingencies - most wards are very specific about what they will restrict. A ward versus bears will do nothing against dogs, wolves, or anything not a bear. Stronger, and more difficult wards such as None Shall Pass These Doors often have contingencies worked into them as they were laid. Some include, none shall pass save for the priests of Nepthys, or Ward against all bears that are not white, or some other wording. This generally increases the difficulty by at least one step, or more for each contingency.

Alarm Wards - not all wards stop, some merely alert someone or a place when they have been breached. These wards might be a step easier to create, and last longer. It would be the magical equivalent to a motion detector, or perhaps a heat sensor.

The Basics
When dealing with warding circles, pentacles and sectioning off parts of towns, or large buildings, a steady hand and good eye are needed to ensure that the warding lines, be they of chalk, salt, ash, or special paint are laid properly. Dexterity is a key attribute in addition to the occult knowledge of warding. Some might be tempted to spend huge sums of money for exotic materials, but in most cases a very common material is just as good. Many rare herbs, and lines of gold will repel the dead, but common salt will do the same for considerably less.

A lesser sort of ward is a fetish. The string of garlic to repel vampires is the best example. This sort of warding relies on knowledge of weakness, and then exploiting said weakness. Garlic to repel vampires, while cold iron to scare away sprites and fairies.

And thus ends the Art of Warding Go to Comment
Low Sorcery
Systems  (Societal/ Cultural)   (Defining)
Scrasamax's comment on 2006-02-07 02:16 PM
In a basic middle magic setting, the warder would be the most common sort of sorcerer encountered. Every village of at least middling size will have a resident warder, or a circuit warder who travels from village to village in the manner of traveling judges, or priests to check the wards of a village on a regular basis. Larger villages, or gifted ones would be able to field their own resident warder, while larger towns might have a master warder in addition to several apprentices. A full blown city could concievably have a guild of warders who work in concert to maintain the large wards of the city, as well as lesser more specific wards within the city.

Warders would be respected members of their communities as it is their regular use of sorcery that keeps the home hearth free of roaming ghosts, marauding spirits, and other unwelcome denizens. It is a lucky farmer who can have his grainary warded against rats, or the blacksmith who can have his workshop warded against fire.

But for the most part, the warder works to keep the immaterial world at bay. They are also likely to be one a village council in their home village, or a very respected member of the community. In towns and cities, the leader of their circle, or guild, as there is no world wide heirarchy of warders with a grand hierophant of warders, is often an advisor to the local nobility, or a seated member of the ruling council. Go to Comment
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