Strolen\s Citadel content. 
Venom of Endless Life
Items  (Potion)   (Magical)
Nobody's comment on 2006-09-26 04:00 PM
Actually, I don't recommend using it as a main quest. It is actually a better idea to have as a last resort for anything else. Sick child? Evil Curse? Cancer? Arthritis? Old man in a coma?

In fact, I would use it in none life-threatening situations where somebody wants to cure a long time affliction like a bad knee or a case of asthma. If the PC's manage to do everything correctly, they could get some great rewards and a powerful contact, but a mistake could mean that they have a dead noble, or worse, a dead noble's father.

No, the snake cannot be transported. I don't have any actual pre-existing reason, but suffice it to say that an elixer that can grant near immortality should be near impossible to use limmitlessly. It is a balance thing.

I guess if the players went to significant trouble to transport a large portion of the eco-system, then I might let them get away with it, but I would ensure that too many attempts at that resulted in a ruined fountain of youth.

One final note: I don't really intend for this to be a stellar piece of work. Just something to contribute that you might like to use. I have some other submissions that I am trying to do really well, and they are taking priority right now.

-Nobody Go to Comment
Venom of Endless Life
Items  (Potion)   (Magical)
Scrasamax's comment on 2006-09-30 12:53 AM
While I wouldn't go as far as comparing this to atomic energy, the process seems a bit to spread out and disjointed to me. Go to Comment
Venom of Endless Life
Items  (Potion)   (Magical)
Cheka Man's comment on 2006-09-26 06:01 PM
Not a process that I would want to go through.I suppose one could get the snake Steve Irwin style without being bitten, get the tea, grind the root properly, and THEN get bitten by the snake, drink the tea, eat the root, kill or otherwise deal with the snake, and then be straitjacketed to stop the rash being scratched open. Go to Comment
Venom of Endless Life
Items  (Potion)   (Magical)
Ancient Gamer's comment on 2006-09-26 01:49 PM
A decent idea. There are potent benefits but the risk and rarity is sufficient in curbing any excess. I like it! Go to Comment
Venom of Endless Life
Items  (Potion)   (Magical)
Pariah's comment on 2006-09-27 09:53 PM
Only voted Go to Comment
Venom of Endless Life
Items  (Potion)   (Magical)
valadaar's comment on 2006-09-26 03:58 PM
I guess I would want some idea of where this snake came from? It's power indicates definite divine intent but why? Go to Comment
Venom of Endless Life
Items  (Potion)   (Magical)
Wulfhere's comment on 2006-09-26 02:05 PM
I'm not as fond of this one. It's penalties are very "All or Nothing", you're either cured, or you're dead. It sounds like the plot use would be: Give the character (either a PC or Patron NPC) some disease/poison/injury/decrepitude, then make them run all over the country getting the cure.

There could be some good RP moments there: For example, they encounter someone who desperately needs their help while they are already in a race to get to the curative roots. Do they tell them to go pound sand or do they let the afflicted one die?

On the other hand, that plot could easily become a "rail job", where their choices are nonexistent.

Could the snake be brought to the land of the root? If not, why not? Does it have odd dietary requirements? Go to Comment
Venom of Endless Life
Items  (Potion)   (Magical)
Wulfhere's comment on 2006-09-26 04:19 PM
I agree with your comments about moving the snake; it's something that players are likely to try, so it had to be considered, lest the GM be painted into a corner. Go to Comment
The Kemlar Healing Potion
Items  (Potion)   (Non-Magical)
manfred's comment on 2007-10-06 01:05 PM
An okay item with a little extra, and some pondering to do before one uses it - good work.

Added the 'Drugs' freetext. Go to Comment
The Kemlar Healing Potion
Items  (Potion)   (Non-Magical)
MoonHunter's comment on 2006-04-04 03:02 AM
Once the addictive properties become known, why would anyone buy these? Go to Comment
The Kemlar Healing Potion
Items  (Potion)   (Non-Magical)
Nobody's comment on 2006-04-04 08:05 AM
Updated: Added Side Notes Go to Comment
The Kemlar Healing Potion
Items  (Potion)   (Non-Magical)
Nobody's comment on 2006-04-04 08:09 AM
Thats like asking why anybody would buy heroine. (beats me) Go to Comment
The Kemlar Healing Potion
Items  (Potion)   (Non-Magical)
Scrasamax's comment on 2006-04-03 05:03 PM
I like the breakdown of the plant component of the potion, but while the drawback seems rather...extreme, I think it is a fair trade for a healing potion that lasts for more than one turn. Go to Comment
The Kemlar Healing Potion
Items  (Potion)   (Non-Magical)
Cheka Man's comment on 2006-04-03 07:01 PM
A healing potion that turns out to be rather like heroin. A good tool for an assassin to carry or to be found in a tomb as the secret revenge of the dead on grave-robbers. Go to Comment
The Kemlar Healing Potion
Items  (Potion)   (Non-Magical)
Pariah's comment on 2006-04-11 09:33 PM
There are ALOT of drugs that we still use that have addictive qualities. And you've gotta remember, this is multiple years in the 'past.' If it was my only chance of survival I'd probably use it, especially if I knew I could get the healing I needed latter. Go to Comment
The Kemlar Healing Potion
Items  (Potion)   (Non-Magical)
Murometz's comment on 2006-04-03 11:23 PM
Cheka beat me to the Heroin line.

My pc's just finished getting banged up and will be heading to a nearby monastery they heard about next session, for some much needed healing and R&R. The monastery just became a crack addict den!! The monastery is in the pepper hills you see and.....

Thanks Nobody!! Go to Comment
The Kemlar Healing Potion
Items  (Potion)   (Non-Magical)
Murometz's comment on 2007-10-06 12:56 PM
Actually, not heroin, more like addiction to pain-killers, me'thinks, would be a more appropriate analogy. Go to Comment
The Kemlar Healing Potion
Items  (Potion)   (Non-Magical)
valadaar's comment on 2014-04-21 09:23 AM
I personally would make the downsides more random and slower, to give time to deal with it, and to produce more characters who have been impacted by it.

At the risk of being overly 'scientific' - something I dislike when combined with fantasy, I could easily see an aggressive healing potion being capable of inducing quite virulent cancers.



Go to Comment
Broom of the Dai Kiri
Items  (Home/ Personal)   (Combat)
Barbarian Horde's comment on 2006-05-06 10:59 PM
...ironically, I came across the dai kiri pages while researching person-to-group hand-to-hand combat. Odd...

~shrug~ Figured I'd toss in a little bit of commentary and analysis from my RL martial studies. Since by the time I'm done with the broom, I'll probably sound like a majorly-retentive @$$hole, I figure I should probably add my real views now; I am deeply and truly impressed by the amount of thought, cultural development, and backstory which has gone into these pieces, and honestly feel that you have created a true classic, whether applied to fiction or RPG gaming.

...now, the broom...

>these brooms usually had three very long,
>thin nails driven...

This would brutally split the wood. The standard technique is to burn the hole with the heated iron rod which reinforces the piece.

>Mixed in with the supple bristles of the
>broom handle, were long needles about half
>the length of the bristles. These needled
>were loosely attached to the wood, and
>thinly feathered so that they would fly in
>a straight line.

The problems of dirt and entanglement were brought up earlier. Usually, IRL, flick-darts are fired by being held in a tube which is then, well... flicked. You might wanna bore a hole in the shaft, where the broomhead detaches, and cover the opening in ricepaper - strong enough to hold it in, thin enough to let the darts fly with a good flick.

...incidentally, a similar modern technique is used with a sharpened pencil and a wooden flute, for unarmed ranged combat with no conspicuous posessions... but that's another story.

>Attached to the Broom handle, was a curved
>blade concealed within the reinforced
>broom-head.

In "peasant rebellion" martial arts, "blade" usually means "blood" usually means "evidence at the scene" - bujinkan and related arts, arguably the "gold standard" of peasant insurrection, have a wide array of techniques for repeatedly snapping a neck which incorporate return to a concealed position and dragging off the body for disposal of evidence in a smooth, fluid motion, whereas the heart-removal techniques (yes, they do exist) tended to be reserved - along with the corresponding "mess in the marketplace" - for the soldiers of the nobility.

Historically, the human heart has been an excellent way to count bounty.

...now that I've got y'all looking at me like I'm some sort of blinking psychopath, I'll just summarize with the notion that a trail of blood leading to the guard's body has been historically viewed as a very quick way to lose one's "underground movement" status. The usual remedy is to use some sort of padded stub, stud, or knob, suitable for seperating ribs and sealing arteries without spilling the blood inside. How you resolve this issue is up to you.

...also, one historical development which may interest you was the concealed weighted chain; a section was carved out of an item - often a sword or knife handle - a chain was coiled inside, and the pommel was carefully weighted to provide a ready, concealed manruki-gusari, footmans flail, or host of similar concealed weaponry.

...it just so happens that lead melts at low enough temperature that it will not burn through wood.

I have no idea how you will adress these issues, or whether any of this has been useful to you. Nonetheless, please let me congratulate you on an intricate and well-thought-out contribution to the global rpg community - it's a fascinating storyline and some good, solid items to go with it. You've upped the bar of creativity for everyone. Go to Comment
Broom of the Dai Kiri
Items  (Home/ Personal)   (Combat)
MoonHunter's comment on 2006-02-28 11:36 PM
It has pretty much been said. The post has its own merits. While I am having a little trouble visualizing parts of it, I get the gist.

This weapon would also need martial training to be really effective. Of course, this could be done quite easily... Capoeira being incorporated into dances and most Karate-te (Okinawan ) peasant agricultural weapons (which were later folded into other Karate-dos in the region). So martial masters are hiding amongst the shop keepers.

Above ALL I would like to see a Dai Kiri Society Post, as well as some other related posts (martial arts system maybe?) Go to Comment
Total Comments:
306

Join Now!!



Footbinding

       By: Moonlake

In ancient China, women bind their feet for cosmetic reasons, resulting in them not able to walk without help and walking in a shuffling gait.

Possibly this can be modified such that people do it for less stupid reasons.

Disclaimer: This is NOT a racist remark since I'm Chinese myself and hence entitled to freely judge Chinese customs. NOT sexist either since I'm female as well.

Ideas  ( System ) | March 7, 2009 | View | UpVote 1xp